Tag: skincare

  • News from the Wellness Department | 08.28.2015

    Wellness is in a new location in the center of the the Good Earth Market for all of your core wellness needs.

    Yep! You can now find your personal health care needs altogether in the center of the Co-op! Especially in a natural foods Co-op, it’s essential for supplements (to treat internal conditions) and body care items (for everything on the outside) to co-habitate, as their uses go hand-in-hand. It’s so simple now to find neti pot salt, vitamin C, and manuka honey throat drops to soothe your allergy or cold symptoms! Or choose your favorite body wash and lotion, multivitamin and fish oil all in one sweep.

    The idea of creating a more intimate shopping area for those personal items has become a reality. The new space is unexpectedly enhanced by a cheery skylight. While most of the Co-op is filled with delicious aromas wafting from our kitchen, the new Wellness area has taken on its own blend of florals and essential oils: “It smells so good in here!” (as heard from several shoppers).

    Being in the center of the Co-op brings to mind that it could be compared to the human heart, the crucial source of vibrance in the body. I know that’s a stretch, to claim the energy of the Co-op begins with my departments! However I DO really like the idea of it being an inviting place where anyone can relax in a calm moment, gain focus and energy, and be centered. Have you experienced the new Wellness Center yet?

    Dolly’s Picks:
    * Acure is a new favorite of mine! From face care to body care you can’t lose here! Using a minimal variety of really clean ingredients, they have formulas to meet everyone’s needs, all packaged beautifully. Skin moisturizers are not greasy and smell fantastic (unless you choose unscented!), and I love all of the shampoos and conditioners. Come in and check them out!

    * HealthForce is an awesome company providing us with mostly powdered supplements, All of their herbal and whole food blends are raw, vegan, gluten free, and mix easily into your favorite juice, smoothie, or even water. Check these out and add your choice to your daily diet, for everything from a natural energy boost to deep cleansing action.


  • Fair-Trade Company’s CEO to Visit Billings | 09.28.2013

    AlaffiaAlaffia, a Fair Trade body care company based in Olympia, WA, is celebrating its 10 year anniversary by sending CEO Olowo-n’djo Tchala on a two month, 8,780 mile, couch surfing tour across the US in a biodiesel van. The money saved on hotel rooms is being donated to their women’s maternal health care program in Togo, West Africa.

    Ten years ago, Alaffia began as a pledge, a pledge to promote gender equality by empowering women and bringing recognition to the indigenous knowledge they possess. Alaffia’s first co-op was made up of 50 women from 20 different ethnic groups, and has since grown to well over 500 women representing 70 percent of the 42 known ethnic groups in Togo. These co-ops are member-owned and exclusively employ women who receive a steady income and are empowered by valuing their traditional knowledge. As stated by Alaffia co-founder Rose Hyde: “In all of the other countries [In Africa] I’ve been in, I’ve never seen anything that compares to it. I’ve never seen a place where women go to work and it’s theirs.”

    As Alaffia grows, so does the number of women empowered, and communities uplifted, through Community Projects in Togo. These include the Maternal Health Program, which provides post and prenatal care for 1,000 women each year; planting 10,000 trees each year through their Reforestation Project, and empowering thousands of students with transportation through Bicycles for Education.

    During the months of September and October Alaffia’s CEO, Olowo-n’djo Tchala, will personally travel the US thanking stores and consumers for their support.

    “The reason our cooperatives continue to exist is the opportunities each and every one of you have given to Alaffia. My objective is to personally visit with you as an extension of my gratitude.” –Olowo-n’djo Tchala

    On Monday, October 21 at 9:00am, Alaffia Co- Founder Olowo-n’djo Tchala will be at Good Earth Market to give a presentation.  You are invited to come meet Olowo-n’djo and hear more about empowerment through fair trade.

    More information about Alaffia: www.alaffia.com.

    Tour information: www.alaffia.com/tour or http://trackmytour.com/3VvFt Twitter: @AlaffiaSkinCare #TheEmpowermentTour

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/AlaffiaSustainableSkincare

    Blog: blog.alaffia.com

     


  • Food for Skin: Summer Foods that Promote Healthy Skin | 07.11.2013

    Summer is well upon us with warmth and sunshine. Our skin takes a beating with the elements of dry hot wind, pool water, and too much sun. How can we continue to have beautiful glowing, hydrated skin all summer long?

    The season of summer has its own special foods, color, elements, and influence. The element of summer is fire and this element rules the heart and small intestine. The heart represents not only the actual heart organ, but the emotional state and memory. When our hearts are healthy, we are able to solve problems effortlessly and arrive at brilliant solutions. The emotion for the summer heart is joy, and the sound is laughter.

    The fire element is associated with the color red, so all foods that are red in color, including tomatoes, red peppers, beets, strawberries and cranberries benefit the heart and small intestine. Lycopine, an antioxidant, is very beneficial for the heart organ.

    Some foods that are calming include mushrooms, brown rice, oats, and jujube.  Herbs such as chamomile, catnip, skullcap, passion flower, and valerian are calming and very helpful when your mind is racing and you cannot go to sleep.

    The summer skin can have too much redness, such as having flushed faces, rosecea, eczema, and psoriasis. Where there is too much redness in the face, the foods that are bitter can combat chronic congestion in the nose, lungs or face, as well as yeast overgrowth, obesity and skin eruptions. Bitter foods are very good for anybody who suffers with congestion on the face. The bitter taste also increases intestinal muscle contraction, which helps with the peristalsis movement in the intestines. This means good movement in the digestive system, and good digestive movement removes toxins in the body and helps clear the skin.  Some bitter foods include rhubarb, kale, watercress and celery.

    WatermelonOther great foods for summertime are roasted red peppers, watermelon, or chilled tomato soups to bring back the fluids lost during perspiration. Of course, drink plenty of water and use sunscreen.

    Managing the hydration levels in the body and skin is very important for having beautiful skin. As mentioned above, eating foods that have a water content is the best way to get that extra water into our systems.

    Watermelon, our most famous summer food, is amazing and in my next workshop, we will explore just how amazing watermelon is and how it benefits our skin and body.

    During the summer months, nature is at its most expansive, abundant manifestation. The sun is at its highest, food is plentiful, and all plant life is full of vital life force. So eat healthy summer foods, be filled with summer Joy, laugh a lot, and infuse the energy of the color red.  All this will enhance the summer glow with your skin that the vital life force produces.

    Learn more about summer foods and protecting your skin at Susan’s next workshop, Saturday, July 13, 1:00pm-2:00pm. Susan Reddig, B.S., is a Licensed Esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings, and Holistic Healthy Eating Coach. Susan’s focus is on beautiful skin through safe product and healthy eating.

     


  • Food for Skin: Spring Foods for Clear Skin | 03.29.2013

    Tree - stock exchangeSpring Fever’s bite is just around the corner.  We are anxious to smell the fresh air, feel the warm breeze and enjoy the promise of new life and rejuvenation.  During the Winter season, the cocooning and self reflection can now give way to the creative and bursting energy of Spring.  This energy is reaching from the depths of the earth and pushes with an upward rising movement stretching to the Heavens.  The very thought of Spring with its many colors and clean fragrance will refresh, nourish, and stimulate.  The color of Green is the energetic life color of the trees, plants, leaves, and grasses.

    In Spring, the element of Wood is symbolized by the tree that has roots planted in the earth and branches reaching to the Heavens.  The trunk holds life between the two worlds.  The human organs that correlate with the Wood Element are the liver and gallbladder. The liver is the organ in charge of helping the body break down toxins and when it is functioning properly peace and harmony are felt and there is focused direction and self-responsibility. When it is stagnated, there is anger, depression, and frustration.

    The Spring skin is the acne skin. This skin is red, inflamed, and congested. There may be rashes, allergic reactions, and eczema flare ups.  This is a good time to do a liver detoxification and eat simple dishes with lots of green vegetables. Sour foods also stimulate the liver and gallbladder.  The sour taste has an absorbing astringent function, stopping abnormal discharges of fluid from the body, like excessive sebum on the face.  Examples of sour foods are vinegar and lemons. Anybody who has papules and congestion on the face should drink a hot cup of water with one-half a lemon first thing in the morning. The hot water and lemon stimulate the liver to release bile and break up fats.  Other examples of sour foods are limes , pickles ,sour apples, sour plums, leeks, blackberries, grapes, mangoes. olives, raspberries, tangerines, tomatoes, sourdough bread, adzuki beans. Vegetables include broccoli, parsley, lettuce, carrots, alfalfa, beets, zucchini, shitake mushrooms, artichokes, cucumbers, celery, endive, and watercress.  The liver can be nourished and assisted in healing by eating foods and herbs that enhance the wood element.  Drinking a tea with dandelion, beet greens, and lemon will go far and is so simple to do.

    This Spring is a great time to get some healthy nutrition through green smoothies. Smoothies are fun and easy to make in your blender or nutibullet type of mixer.  An awesome green smoothie is one made with green vegetables and green fruits along with a small amount of antioxidant berries.  By helping the liver and gall bladder be strong, the skin will become clearer and healthier.

    Your Spring challenge is to stand tall, stretch for the heavens and keep your feet grounded to the earth. Join me for our next class on seasonal foods that promote healthy skin!

    Learn more about spring skin solutions at Susan’s workshop, Food and Skin: Spring Detox and Clarity on Saturday, April 13, 1-2pm.  Susan Reddig, B.S. is a licensed esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings, focusing on beautiful skin from the inside out.  www.billingsclinicalskinsolutions.com.


  • Food and Skin: Winter Skin Survival | 01.09.2013

    Replenish, Build, Conserve, Hydrate

    It’s the new year – time to burrow in and begin to replenish the skin, body, mind, and spirit. Winter means shoveling snow, bitter winds, bundling up with layers, and dry, scratchy skin. Winter also is a time for the crackling sound of the fireplace, cuddling up in a warm electric throw, or cooking a favorite soup or stew that will warm the insides and relieve the bone-cold chill.

    In the season of winter, the element is Water and the color is black. Water energy is flowing, deeply internal, and the base of life. Water energy encourages hibernation and self-reflection. One can consider this a time of storing energy and replenishing so that when spring comes there will be bursting of new energy and growth!  Winter skin has a tendency to be dry and itchy. We may notice wrinkles, a pale complexion, dark circles under the eyes, hyper pigmentation, red blotchiness, fluid retention, and clogged congested pores.

    Which is the best way to thrive in winter and save our skin?  First, for survival is the need to honor the winter quietness and stillness that is deep within all, to have a place of fulfillment and peace. Next, eat foods that nourish the Water Element. Some suggestions are watermelon, blackberries, blueberries, eggs, cloves, ginger, cinnamon bark, everything in the onion family, chicken, salmon, caviar and seaweeds. Salty and spicy flavors encourage health, but use sea salt rather than regular table salt. Making soups or stews will be warming and will help us tolerate the frosty days. Soups continue to be easy on the digestive tract, helping the body maintain its quietness. 

    Now for the skin. An excellent supplement for skin health is taking a fish oil supplement and eating non-white fish, like salmon. Fish oil lubricates, helps relieve the winter aches and pains, reduces inflammation, and can help to relieve that dry itchiness. Topically, it is very important that ingredients such as hyaluronic acid are in your moisturizer or lotion. Another soothing skin option right from our kitchen cupboard is olive oil. Nothing could be easier!  Use your olive oil to blend with regular moisturizers, apply right after showering, or add some sugar to exfoliate. Do something fun, like indulging your skin in a berries mask and eating dark chocolate.  Your skin will love you.  And you will love your skin.

    This winter avoid the itchies, the flakies, and the reddies by eating healthy warming soups and foods, applying topical soothing oils, and finding time to retreat for self-reflection, meditation and energy conservation. These simple steps will do more for your skin than you can imagine.  In January of the new year, take the challenge to change your approach of skin health care to nourish your whole person. Winter is the time to Replenish, Conserve, Build, and Hydrate.

    Learn more about winter skin solutions at Susan’s workshop, Food and Skin: Winter Skin Survival on Saturday, January 12, 1-2pm.  Susan Reddig, B.S. is a licensed esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings, focusing on beautiful skin from the inside out.  www.billingsclinicalskinsolutions.com.

     


  • Heal Your Skin with Fall Foods | 09.10.2012

    Do you know that food is good for the skin inside and outside? When I look at seasonal foods that are beneficial for the skin, I love to find new ways to integrate nature’s Elements into a skin care routine. These Elements are connected to the seasons that influence our foods and our bodies.  Learning how to choose a seasonal food for topical use in order to produce smooth and healthier skin appearance can motivate all of us towards a healthier lifestyle.  

    Soup for Sagging Skin

    Our skin transitions through the seasons and we may find we need to use a different product or have a clinical facial to boost the cellular process.  The transition period, according to some traditions, is called the Earth Element.  During the late summer, we experience a brief pause between the high energy of summer and the hot sun to shorter days and cooler nights.  The Earth Element is associated with the colors yellow and orange -foods like pumpkin, squash, butternut squash, yellow peppers, peaches, nectarines, papaya, pineapple, mangoes, and corn benefit the bodily organs of Earth, the spleen/pancreas and stomach.  The fall has a tendency to see dry and scaly skin as the skin may not be exfoliating fast enough and the metabolism of the skin may be slow. The Earth Element manifests itself around the mouth and a weak Earth Element (digestion) shows up on the face as sagging eyelids and jowls, and loose skin under the chin.

    So, help! It looks like my Earth Element is sagging!  What can I do?   Here is a list of spices and seasonal foods that can help to tonify and warm the earth (digestion): ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, fennel, and nutmeg.  Fall foods that can be added to your meals are carrots, sweet potatoes, parsnips, turnips, pumpkin, rutabagas, onion, leeks, and barley.  The best way to eat these foods are cooked and made into a soup.  Soups are comfort food, since they are easy on the digestive track.

    We  now have a basic understanding of what foods to eat from the Earth season that will help from the inside.  So which food would be a great all around topical treat to give our skin that healthy glow we are all looking for?  I definitely have a favorite.  It is a food that has multiple uses and functions all season long.  It is high in vitamin C, Vitamin A, anti-oxidants, enzymes that exfoliate, has emollients, phospholipids, Vitamin B,  Salicylic Acid, sugar, zinc, and on and on.  This food has an amazing oil that is awesome for the skin. 

    To discover this exemplary food that is nutritious for our body inside and outside, join me for the first in a seasonal series of “Food and Skin” workshops, “Fall Foods that Promote Healthy Skin“, (Saturday, September 15th at 1 p.m.).  I will share recipes and provide tastings for Soup for Sagging Skin and a facial/body mask.  This workshop explores foods harvested in the fall that we can use to help manage problematic or aging skin.

     Susan Reddig,  B.S., is a Licensed Esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings .

     


  • Protecting Your Skin | 07.24.2012

    Alba Suncare products are ON SALE for $6.99 through July 31. Regular price $9.99.

    Summer poses great challenges with managing our skin care. We love the warm sun and how comforting it feels on our skin. We feel the freedom of unencumbered movement due to less clothing or, at the least, lighter weight clothing. The smell of fresh air seduces us out from behind our walls of our homes or places of work.  Oh, it feels so good to be free!

    How do we enjoy the sun, which is natural and integral to the function of life, yet protect ourselves from its dangerous and life-threatening rays? The first way to protect ourselves is to be well informed of the types of ultraviolet rays and how they affect our skin.  The second way is to educate ourselves on what the SPF ratings really mean. The third way is to know what ingredients are most effective.

    Understanding the UV Rays
    UVA = Aging, UVB = Burning and cancer.   We know there are two main ultraviolet rays that we need to be aware of. They are the UVA and UVB rays. UVA rays have less energy, but penetrate deeper into the skin, causing damage to the connective tissue and creating aging, sun spots, hyper pigmentation, wrinkles, and leathery skin. UVA is always emitting, even on cloudy days. These rays increase the risk of skin cancer.

    Susan out for a ride. Pay attention to exposed areas!

    UVB rays are damaging, but only on the surface. Don’t let that fool you. UVB rays are the burning, redness, sunburn, blistering, and dryness that often causes skin cancer. They are strongest during the mid-day and are able to reflect off of water and snow.

    What’s SPF?
    SPF ratings can be confusing and are relevant only to the UVB rays. SPF is a measure of how sunscreen works against UVB rays. We are prone to think that the higher a reading is, the more protection there is. In reality, the higher rating diminishes in effectiveness. The difference between SPF levels gets small as the numbers go higher. For instance, the difference between 15 and 30 is bigger than between 30 and 45, therefore, using an SPF of 45 is not much more effective than SPF 30.

    Which ingredients should you look for?

    • Look for sun protection that includes zinc oxide. Zinc Oxide is a physical block and is the most effective. Titanium Dioxide, is also a physical block but less effective than zinc oxide, and Avobenzone is a chemical screen. Both Zinc Oxide and Titanium Dioxide are the most important to have in the list.
    • Look for the words “Broad Spectrum”. A Broad Spectrum will protect from both the UVA and UVB rays.

    Local suncare products are healthy for your skin.

    The best way to apply sunblock is very liberal. Some doctors say to be a “grease monkey”. Reapply every two hours and, if you are in the water, apply every hour. Wearing a hat and other protective clothing is advised.  And don’t forget the little areas, such as, ears, back of neck, tops of feet, and scalp.

    That area of skin that didn’t get covered? Add the back of hands to the list of little areas. Ouch!

    Susan Reddig, B.S., L.E., is a licensed esthetician and owner of Clinical Skincare Solutions. located at 2900 12th Avenue North.