Tag: Board of Directors

  • New Members of our Board of Directors | 01.20.2014

    Congratulations to our recently elected Board Members!  During the month of October, with voting results announced at our Annual Meeting, you, the members, co-operatively elected Adam Cassie (newly appointed Treasurer), Maggie Zaback, and Theresa Keaveny (Secretary) to our board.

    These three board members join the following individuals on the Good Earth Market board of directors – Carol Beam, President; Kevin Dowling, newly appointed Vice President; Greg Jahn; Heide Mankin; Jeff Kreidler; and Diane Brien.   Learn more about our board of directors here.

    We would also like to thank those who have resigned from the board – Dana Pulis, Peter Tolton and Alan Ostby (former Treasurer).  We greatly appreciate your years of dedicated service to the Co-op, helping to grow our Co-op to where it is today.

    Our board of directors

    Front row left to right:  Greg Jahn, Jeff Kreidler

    Middle row, left to right:  Adam Cassie, Joshua Jackson (General Manager), Carol Beam, Perry McNeese (former General Manager), Diane Brien, Maggie Zaback

    Back row:  Kevin Dowling


  • Board Notes: The Co-op Triple Bottom Line | 07.19.2013

    THE “2020 CHALLENGE” – This is the 3rd in a series of articles dedicated to the “2020 Challenge”.  The 2012 Year of the Co-op came to an end but in the eyes of the International Co-operative Alliance, 2012 marked the beginning of the “2020 Challenge”. The “2020 Challenge” is simple:

    • Co-operatives will lead in economic, social and environmental sustainability, and
    • Co-ops will be the preferred model for business, and
    • Co-ops will be the fastest growing form of enterprise.

    The starting point for this “2020 Challenge” is the powerful claim which co-ops make to the outside world – we have a way of doing business that is better than most. We give individuals active participation through ownership, making them more engaged in the success of the co-op. And the co-op business model creates greater economic, social and environmental sustainability.

    There are 5 interlinked themes that will make this decade of the co-op successful:

    1) Elevate participation within membership and governance to a new level.
    2) Position co-ops as builders of sustainability.
    3) Build the co-operative message and secure the co-operative identify.
    4) Ensure supportive legal frameworks for co-operative growth.
    5) Secure reliable co-operative capital while guaranteeing member control.

     

    Building Sustainability
    Although there are some local exceptions, at present sustainability is not a term that is universally associated with co-operatives. This needs to change by 2020. The co-op movement needs to demonstrate a deep commitment to sustainability, as well as its positive contribution to sustainability in 3 senses – economic, social and environmental. In the sustainable world, having a focus on these 3 senses is often referred to as the “Triple Bottom Line” concept – profit, people and place. Contrast this with the “Single Bottom Line” concept of all other business models – profit. Co-ops have always set out to enable people to have access to goods and services without exploitation. This means trading in accordance with a set of values that believe in the “triple bottom line” approach. By placing human need at the center, co-ops seek to optimize outcomes for a range of stakeholders rather than maximizing the benefit of any single stakeholder.

    So how do we go about measuring the value we produce with our “Triple Bottom Line” approach?

    Economic sustainability (profit)
    There is evidence that a diversity of ownership contributes to a more stable financial sector. The investor-owned company was central to how the financial crisis occurred, with managers acting in the interests of themselves and a very small number of stakeholders. Contrast this with co-operatives. We act in the interests of our members, pursuing value for everyone and making us intrinsically less risky. Take the example of co-op banks and credit unions.  They have never made headlines for causing a financial crisis – in fact, most have quietly grown and prospered because of the co-op business model.

    Social Sustainability (people)
    Among the negative externalities generated by contemporary capitalism are social problems associated with inequities. The study of social capital suggests that societies with higher levels of membership associations do better economically, enjoying higher levels of trust and democratic participation. Co-ops contribute to the stock of a nation’s social capital in ways that traditional businesses do not. The United Nations, for example, urges governments to encourage and facilitate the establishment and development of co-ops, including taking measures aimed at enabling people living in poverty or belonging to vulnerable groups to engage on a voluntary basis in the creation and development of co-ops.

    Environmental Sustainability (place)
    There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that co-ops have a superior environmental record. Much of this is due to the co-op business model and the concerns for the future environmental outcomes. We are less focused on calculating a return on investment and more focused on the greater good (the “Triple Bottom Line”.)

    All of this discussion around sustainability is great but it won’t serve us well unless we help others understand the importance of the “Triple Bottom Line”. As a co-op, we have much to gain from seizing our approach and demonstrating its positive impact. We need to step up to the challenge of advocating for and demonstrating the value of our “Triple Bottom Line” to attract interest from the broader public, policy makers and young people. We need to work closer with other co-op businesses in our market to reinforce the sustainability of the co-op business model. As a board, we will be much more proactive in helping everyone to understand the “Triple Bottom Line”. As a member, you should be as well.

    Next – building the co-operative message and securing the co-operative identify.

    Carol BeamCarol Beam is the president of GEM’s Board of Directors.

     


  • Board Notes: The 2020 Challenge | 03.29.2013

    The Year of the Co-op, 2012, has come to an end but in the eyes of the International Co-operative Alliance 2012 marked the beginning of the “2020 Challenge”.  The “2020 Challenge” is simple:

    • Co-operatives will lead in economic, social and environmental sustainability and
    • Co-ops will be the preferred model for business and
    • Co-ops will be the fastest growing form of enterprise.

    The starting point for this “2020 Challenge” is the powerful claim which co-ops make to the outside world – we have a way of doing business that is better than most.  We give individuals active participation through ownership, making them more engaged in the success of the co-op.  And the co-op business model creates greater economic, social and environmental sustainability.

    There are 5 interlinked themes that will make this decade of the co-op successful:
    1)      Elevate participation within membership and governance to a new level.
    2)      Position co-ops as builders of sustainability.
    3)      Build the co-operative message and secure the co-operative identify.
    4)      Ensure supportive legal frameworks for co-operative growth.
    5)      Secure reliable co-operative capital while guaranteeing member control.

    Over the course of the next 5 articles, my column will focus on each of these interlinked themes to help us all understand more about ourselves and begin to elevate our thinking to truly embrace the “2020 Challenge”.  Next article will focus on elevating participation.

    In the meantime, you have many opportunities to elevate your participation in your co-op.  You can attend one or more of the many workshops that are offered each month.   And don’t forget to check out the working member opportunities board (near the restrooms).

    One of the unique things about being a co-op is that we are all much more than just shoppers – we are vested owners.  Perhaps each of us should take our own “2020 Challenge” and decide how we can each be a better co-op member.  Sounds fun, doesn’t it?

    Carol Beam, Board of Directors President

    Carol Beam is the President of the Board of Directors.  Feedback?  Contact Carol!


  • Board Notes: What’s your relationship with your co-op? | 05.24.2012

     by Carol Beam, Board President

    Theresa Keaveny and I had the opportunity to attend the National Cooperative Grocers Association (NCGA) Western Corridor Training for Boards and Leaders.  The day we spent with our peers from co-ops throughout the west was invigorating.  Our membership is the NCGA co-op not only helps us throughout our operations, but it is a gold mine when it comes to education and training.  Here are some of my take-aways from the day long event:

    NCGA is comprised of 125 co-ops nationwide.  There are 160 stores in 35 states.  To help put it into perspective, NCGA co-ops did $1.5B in sales in 2011 (contrasted to the $10B for Whole Foods).  NCGA’s success has a direct correlation to the success of its member co-ops.  That is one reason why NCGA is spending much of its time and energy these days promoting the growth of the co-op food industry.  Based on data compiled by the NCGA staff, the organic/local food movement is in a growth pattern, especially as it relates to co-ops.   This is one of the key drivers for NCGA’s emphasis on growth in same store sales as well as growth through the addition of new co-ops into NCGA.  Much of what NCGA will focus on going forward will support the growth of food co-ops.

    One fascinating subject covered at this retreat was membership.  All co-ops share the same member characteristics and I will share them with you – describing the least engaged members (customers) on up to the most engaged members (actives). 

    Which on of these best describes your relationship with the co-op?:

    • Customers – people who shop at the co-op but are not members.  Likely to leave the co-op should a competitor offer more convenience, better selection, price, etc.
    • Shopping Members – people who join for the economic benefits.  They do not think of themselves as owners and feel no additional responsibility or loyalty.  They do not perceive a difference between the co-op and a club store.  Primary interest is “what’s in it for me.”
    • Social participants – people who like belonging to the co-op, though they don’t really experience the connection as “ownership”.  They care about what the co-op stands for in the community, but they may not be very clear on what that is.  They read the newsletter, but probably wouldn’t call to comment on an article.  If asked, they will respond to a survey.  They are more likely to attend a co-op dance than the membership meeting.  It is important to provide opportunities for involvement with issues they care about.
    • Member Owners – people who understand that their equity is required to capitalize the co-op.  They think of themselves as owners and they are interested in the governance of the co-op.  They always plan to vote in elections and occasionally they do.  They feel that they should go to the annual meeting, but only rarely do so.
    • Active participants – people who are active in the co-op.  They are the leaders and decision makers who serve or have served on the board or committees.  They pay close attention to what the co-op does and what decisions are made.  They take their ownership responsibility very seriously.  They usually vote in elections and regularly attend co-op functions.

    The goal and challenge for the board and staff of the co-op is to ensure that each person has a high degree of satisfaction with their level of involvement.  The co-op must understand and meet the needs people have at each level before they will be motivated to “move up”.  And as a board and staff, we must always remember that people have the right to select their level of involvement.   We must engage them all.

    Thank you for the opportunity to experience the resources of our membership in NCGA.   It has only served to renew my commitment to the Good Earth Market.