Category: Wellness

  • News from the Wellness Department | 08.28.2015

    Wellness is in a new location in the center of the the Good Earth Market for all of your core wellness needs.

    Yep! You can now find your personal health care needs altogether in the center of the Co-op! Especially in a natural foods Co-op, it’s essential for supplements (to treat internal conditions) and body care items (for everything on the outside) to co-habitate, as their uses go hand-in-hand. It’s so simple now to find neti pot salt, vitamin C, and manuka honey throat drops to soothe your allergy or cold symptoms! Or choose your favorite body wash and lotion, multivitamin and fish oil all in one sweep.

    The idea of creating a more intimate shopping area for those personal items has become a reality. The new space is unexpectedly enhanced by a cheery skylight. While most of the Co-op is filled with delicious aromas wafting from our kitchen, the new Wellness area has taken on its own blend of florals and essential oils: “It smells so good in here!” (as heard from several shoppers).

    Being in the center of the Co-op brings to mind that it could be compared to the human heart, the crucial source of vibrance in the body. I know that’s a stretch, to claim the energy of the Co-op begins with my departments! However I DO really like the idea of it being an inviting place where anyone can relax in a calm moment, gain focus and energy, and be centered. Have you experienced the new Wellness Center yet?

    Dolly’s Picks:
    * Acure is a new favorite of mine! From face care to body care you can’t lose here! Using a minimal variety of really clean ingredients, they have formulas to meet everyone’s needs, all packaged beautifully. Skin moisturizers are not greasy and smell fantastic (unless you choose unscented!), and I love all of the shampoos and conditioners. Come in and check them out!

    * HealthForce is an awesome company providing us with mostly powdered supplements, All of their herbal and whole food blends are raw, vegan, gluten free, and mix easily into your favorite juice, smoothie, or even water. Check these out and add your choice to your daily diet, for everything from a natural energy boost to deep cleansing action.


  • Inner-Ēco Probiotic | 04.10.2014

    Reset and New March 5 (7 of 7)

     

    What is a probiotic?

    Probiotics are bacteria that help maintain the natural balance of organisms (microflora) in the intestines. The normal human digestive tract contains about 400 types of probiotic bacteria that reduce the growth of harmful bacteria and promote a healthy digestive system. The largest group of probiotic bacteria in the intestine is lactic acid bacteria, of which Lactobacillusacidophilus, found in yogurt with live cultures, is the best known. Yeast is also a probiotic substance. Probiotics are also available as dietary supplements. (WebMD)

    I have used probiotics for several years. For me, they have kept inflammation down in my body, my guts regulated, and definitely help me during allergy season. (Results will vary for every person.) Trying several kinds over the years, I’ve been very happy with inner-ēco Fresh Coconut Water Probiotic  while taking it over the past month. I came down with a slight head cold and noticed this probiotic was helpful in reducing symptoms and duration. (Again, results will vary for every person.)

    I have officially switched to inner-ēco and find it very reasonably priced for 30 servings coupled with great results.

    Currently, inner-ēco is on sale for $16.99, reg. $19.99. The sales ends on Tuesday, April 15th.

    Jodie, Marketing Manager

     


  • We Have Organic Maca! | 03.26.2014

    Good Earth Market Co-op is now carrying three types of Raw, Organic Maca from The Maca Team in our bulk section.

    Cooler evolution (8 of 13)

    Not familiar? Maca is a root from the radish family and an esteemed, vitamin-rich root, boasting benefits in many categories including: energy, mood balance, sexual health, skin, men’s health, women’s health, and general health. Sourced from The Maca Team, it is grown in a remote, pristine part of the Peruvian Andes.

    Cream Maca is the most abundant color of Maca and has been used for over 2000 years to boost energy, improve fertility, enhance libido and more. $19.99 per pound

     Black Maca is the most effective Maca type for muscle building and endurance, male fertility and libido, and for mental focus.  $24.99 per pound

     Red Maca is the most effective type for hormone balance, female fertility, and bone and prostate health. It is also the highest in phytonutrients and the best tasting. $24.99 per pound

    Usage: Enjoy it with water, milk, juice, or smoothies. Try taking Maca first thing in the morning and on an empty stomach for quickest results. Daily suggested dosage is 1-3 teaspoons. While there are no known side effects, it should not be taken in large amounts just like any other supplement. It’s okay to begin with a half teaspoon and work your way up to 1-3 teaspoons. Rotating a few days on and off is generally recommended.

    Find Maca in our bulk section which is parked next to our produce section. See you soon!


  • Anti-Cancer Foods: Can Food Be Your Medicine? | 01.09.2014

    You may have more control over your health than you thought!  Whether you have a family history of cancer or are currently battling the disease, there are lifestyle choices which can boost your immune system and minimize your risk of developing cancer and other diseases.

    The consensus of numerous studies is that eating more fruits and vegetables can reduce your risk for developing all types of cancers. Fruits and vegetables contain phytochemicals, compounds found in plants that may help your body fight cancer.  Remember, it is unlikely that any single compound will protect you against cancer; a balanced diet that includes five or more servings of a variety of fruits and vegetables per day will be the most effective way to reduce your risk of developing cancer and here’s why:

    1. Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, radishes, turnips, watercress, brussel sprouts): Cruciferous vegetables contain a variety of compounds (Indole-3-Carbinol, glucosinolates, sulforaphanes) that have been shown in research studies to slow cancer growth and development.

    2. Citrus fruits (lemon, grapefruit, orange): Citrus fruits contain Vitamin C, fiber, flavonoids and ellagic acid; these phytochemicals act as antioxidants, enhancing detoxification and the immune system. High intake of Vitamin C is associated with a decreased incidence of intestinal cancers – vitamin C can block the formation of these cancer-causing compounds.

    3. Dark berries and grapes: Berries contain bioflavonoids (anthocyanidins and ellagic acid), which are two most researched cancer-fighting compounds found in berries. Resveratrol, high in red or purple grapes, is a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and is thought to prevent cell damage before it begins, preventing tumor formation.

    4. Whole grains: Whole grains contain a variety of anti-cancer compounds: fiber, antioxidants, lignans, selenium, zinc and vitamin E which support elimination and detoxification pathways in the body while enhancing the immune system.

    5. Green tea (regular or decaf): A rich source of polyphenols, like epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) may slow or prevent the development of a variety of cancers.

    6.  Garlic and onions (scallions, leeks, and chives): Garlic contains allicin, diallyl disulfide, cysteine, selenium and flavonoids (quercetin), thought to block the formation of cancer-causing agents and slow or stop the growth of tumors.

    7. Spices (especially ginger, rosemary and turmeric): Spices contain many compounds, like curcumin, that act as potent antioxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, and enhance the immune system and detoxification pathways.

    8. Tomatoes: Lycopene is the anti-cancer agent found in tomatoes that has been shown to combat prostate cancer.

    9. Legumes and beans (especially soybeans, garbanzo and kidney): Phytochemicals in beans, isoflavones and genistein, act as hormonal modulators and estrogen receptor blockers. These may be protective in some hormonally-based cancers and are associated with a decreased incidence of digestive cancers.

    10. Nuts and seeds: Essential fatty acids and many nutrients like vitamin E, calcium, magnesium, and zinc are found in nuts and seeds.

    11. Mushrooms: Mushrooms contain polysaccharides and beta-glucans, phytochemicals that promote specific immune cells, like natural killer cells.

    12. Cold-water fish (salmon, cod, halibut):  These are great sources vitamin D and essential fatty acids (EFA’s) like EPA and DHA which enhance immune function and inhibit tumor formation in the body.

    Pic - Dr.  Jeane13. Dark Green Leafy Vegetables: Excellent sources of the carotenoid family of antioxidants, romaine, spinach, mustard greens, parsley, and Swiss are also rich in folate, a vitamin shown to reduce the risk of cervical, breast and lung cancers.

    By Dr. La Deana Jeane, ND, Yellowstone Naturopathic Clinic.  Learn more about making smart food choices to reduce your risk of developing cancer.  Join Dr. Jeane on Thursday January 15th, 2014 for a free workshop at Good Earth Market and visit www.yncnaturally.com.


  • Goals for a More Vital 2014 | 12.22.2013

    Dolly, GEM's Wellness Manager#1 – Build your muscles. Weight lifting and resistance training strengthen muscles, which support bones and joints. For women, it’s crucial for preventing muscle and bone loss with age. Exercising also makes your heart muscle strong (*very important!). Being strong makes daily tasks easier and more enjoyable!

    #2 – Swap it out. Trade your desk chair for a stability ball. Watch your core strength and posture improve!

    #3Eat at least two fish meals per week. The evidence is strong that the oils in darker types of fish, such as salmon, tuna, mackerel and herring, are beneficial for the heart and brain and may even lower risk of cancer.

    #4 – Drink water. Drink an 8-ounce glass of water as soon as you wake up in the morning to rev up your metabolism. Stay hydrated throughout the day! Drinking water can curb the urge to snack mindlessly, especially if you are not truly hungry.

    #5 – Play more. Get a dog, get moving, get up and DO something. Use a pedometer, set a goal for 10,000 steps in a day! Spend time outside. Don’t go without the mood-lifting benefits of sunshine and fresh air!

    #6 – Take up a new hobby. Find an activity that fulfills your passion. Take a class, learn a new skill. Challenge yourself! You can do it!

    #7 – Eat breakfast. Eat small meals every 3-4 hours, include lean protein, healthy fats, and cut out the sugar. This will keep your energy up, and eliminate hunger pangs, especially in the evening.

    #8 – Increase protein & fiber in your daily regime. Make smart food swaps such as turkey for beef, a green salad for starchy peas and corn, whole grains for white processed breads.

    #9 – Add more veggies to your meals. Nutrient-dense options include leafy greens, kale, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, radish, bean sprouts, peppers, turnips, carrots, cauliflower, artichoke, tomato, onion, and garlic.

    #10 – Stop making excuses.  Say YES more often. Try new things!

    #11 – Take your vitamins! It’s difficult to get all you need from the food you eat. Choosing a great multi-vitamin can make a difference

    #12 – Read the labels. Know what’s in your food. Can’t pronounce it? Look it up! Be aware of what goes into your body; be an intentional consumer.

    #13 – Sleep. All healing requires extra sleep.  During the day, one primarily uses the sympathetic nervous system, associated with spending energy and tearing down the body.  This is balanced by the parasympathetic system, associated with rest, nurturing and regeneration of body tissues.  This is equally important and takes place when one is resting.  One may call it maintenance or repair time.

    Written by Dolly Fansler, GEM’s Wellness Manager


  • Food for Skin: Summer Foods that Promote Healthy Skin | 07.11.2013

    Summer is well upon us with warmth and sunshine. Our skin takes a beating with the elements of dry hot wind, pool water, and too much sun. How can we continue to have beautiful glowing, hydrated skin all summer long?

    The season of summer has its own special foods, color, elements, and influence. The element of summer is fire and this element rules the heart and small intestine. The heart represents not only the actual heart organ, but the emotional state and memory. When our hearts are healthy, we are able to solve problems effortlessly and arrive at brilliant solutions. The emotion for the summer heart is joy, and the sound is laughter.

    The fire element is associated with the color red, so all foods that are red in color, including tomatoes, red peppers, beets, strawberries and cranberries benefit the heart and small intestine. Lycopine, an antioxidant, is very beneficial for the heart organ.

    Some foods that are calming include mushrooms, brown rice, oats, and jujube.  Herbs such as chamomile, catnip, skullcap, passion flower, and valerian are calming and very helpful when your mind is racing and you cannot go to sleep.

    The summer skin can have too much redness, such as having flushed faces, rosecea, eczema, and psoriasis. Where there is too much redness in the face, the foods that are bitter can combat chronic congestion in the nose, lungs or face, as well as yeast overgrowth, obesity and skin eruptions. Bitter foods are very good for anybody who suffers with congestion on the face. The bitter taste also increases intestinal muscle contraction, which helps with the peristalsis movement in the intestines. This means good movement in the digestive system, and good digestive movement removes toxins in the body and helps clear the skin.  Some bitter foods include rhubarb, kale, watercress and celery.

    WatermelonOther great foods for summertime are roasted red peppers, watermelon, or chilled tomato soups to bring back the fluids lost during perspiration. Of course, drink plenty of water and use sunscreen.

    Managing the hydration levels in the body and skin is very important for having beautiful skin. As mentioned above, eating foods that have a water content is the best way to get that extra water into our systems.

    Watermelon, our most famous summer food, is amazing and in my next workshop, we will explore just how amazing watermelon is and how it benefits our skin and body.

    During the summer months, nature is at its most expansive, abundant manifestation. The sun is at its highest, food is plentiful, and all plant life is full of vital life force. So eat healthy summer foods, be filled with summer Joy, laugh a lot, and infuse the energy of the color red.  All this will enhance the summer glow with your skin that the vital life force produces.

    Learn more about summer foods and protecting your skin at Susan’s next workshop, Saturday, July 13, 1:00pm-2:00pm. Susan Reddig, B.S., is a Licensed Esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings, and Holistic Healthy Eating Coach. Susan’s focus is on beautiful skin through safe product and healthy eating.

     


  • The Mediterranean Diet | 06.20.2013

    Wine & OlivesEvery nutrition expert wants to tell us the next new diet for healthy living based on current research. Amusingly, it is usually some variation of how people of the Mediterranean have been eating for centuries.

    Special dietary needs aside; the Mediterranean diet has been shown over and over again, in the research, to account for longevity and happy hearts across international borders. So, what’s so special about it? How does this help us in the nether regions where temperatures get well below zero?

    Part of the magic that is the Mediterranean diet is that it can be adapted to anywhere you live! After all, the Mediterranean itself consists of more than a dozen countries with disparate traditional cuisines, yet the health outcomes are similar.

    This way of eating is more a set of principles than telling us exactly which foods to eat. It helps us because right here in Montana we have a wealth of farms that cultivate and raise the type of food we can adapt for the heart healthy benefits this diet offers. It helps to remind us of our connection to where food comes from and its importance on our health. It helps us be mindful of what we are putting in our bodies.

    The foundation of the Mediterranean diet includes the following: every meal should be made up primarily of whole grains, vegetables and fruits, legumes and nuts; an increased amount of unsaturated fats (olive oil and canola oil) when cooking, marinating or making sauces; a limited amount of red meat, sweets and processed foods; and exercise!

    A glass of red wine is an optional component to dinners; and fruit is suggested for desserts. Each meal, or as often as possible, should be savored with friends and family. This is an omega-3, antioxidant, fiber and mineral rich diet. That’s it! There are hundreds of books and plenty of online resources to learn more about how this style of eating is sustaining and healthful.

    Danielle and Federico Ferrero, Italian doctorJoin Danielle Phillips-Dorsett on Wednesday, June 26, 5:30pm – 7:30pm, to learn more about the Mediterranean diet and how locally-grown Montana foods seamlessly adapts to the diet.  The $15 fee includes the demonstration and a family-style dinner, along with recipes and handouts.   Danielle is a former employee of ours, and is now studying naturopathic medicine at Bastyr University in Seattle, Washington.

     

     

     

     


  • Negative Celiac test? You must read this! | 06.11.2013

    It’s impossible for us the Co-op to discount the growing number of our member/owners  who are gluten intolerant or have Celiac Disease.  They take on a wide range of characteristics:  those who NEVER eat gluten, those who try really hard not to eat gluten, those who just decrease the amount they eat…

    TracyK For those who suspect gluten intolerance, the road to diagnosis, or even learning the difference between Celiac’s and gluten-intolerance can be very tricky.  Because of its difficulty in detection, a negative test for Celiac’s may not even be a definitive conclusion.

    Tracy Konoske, MS, RD of Healthy Lifestyles, MT, recognizes that a gluten-free lifestyle and getting an accurate diagnosis can be overwhelming and challenging.  In her latest blog post, Tracy shares her road to a gluten-free lifestyle and breaks down the options for testing and what to do when the test is negative!

    At GEM, we’ve worked to make it easier, and while we don’t have a particular gluten-free department here at the Co-op, we do carry hundreds of certified gluten-free products, all labeled on the shelf with a bright pink shelf tag.


  • Food for Skin: Spring Foods for Clear Skin | 03.29.2013

    Tree - stock exchangeSpring Fever’s bite is just around the corner.  We are anxious to smell the fresh air, feel the warm breeze and enjoy the promise of new life and rejuvenation.  During the Winter season, the cocooning and self reflection can now give way to the creative and bursting energy of Spring.  This energy is reaching from the depths of the earth and pushes with an upward rising movement stretching to the Heavens.  The very thought of Spring with its many colors and clean fragrance will refresh, nourish, and stimulate.  The color of Green is the energetic life color of the trees, plants, leaves, and grasses.

    In Spring, the element of Wood is symbolized by the tree that has roots planted in the earth and branches reaching to the Heavens.  The trunk holds life between the two worlds.  The human organs that correlate with the Wood Element are the liver and gallbladder. The liver is the organ in charge of helping the body break down toxins and when it is functioning properly peace and harmony are felt and there is focused direction and self-responsibility. When it is stagnated, there is anger, depression, and frustration.

    The Spring skin is the acne skin. This skin is red, inflamed, and congested. There may be rashes, allergic reactions, and eczema flare ups.  This is a good time to do a liver detoxification and eat simple dishes with lots of green vegetables. Sour foods also stimulate the liver and gallbladder.  The sour taste has an absorbing astringent function, stopping abnormal discharges of fluid from the body, like excessive sebum on the face.  Examples of sour foods are vinegar and lemons. Anybody who has papules and congestion on the face should drink a hot cup of water with one-half a lemon first thing in the morning. The hot water and lemon stimulate the liver to release bile and break up fats.  Other examples of sour foods are limes , pickles ,sour apples, sour plums, leeks, blackberries, grapes, mangoes. olives, raspberries, tangerines, tomatoes, sourdough bread, adzuki beans. Vegetables include broccoli, parsley, lettuce, carrots, alfalfa, beets, zucchini, shitake mushrooms, artichokes, cucumbers, celery, endive, and watercress.  The liver can be nourished and assisted in healing by eating foods and herbs that enhance the wood element.  Drinking a tea with dandelion, beet greens, and lemon will go far and is so simple to do.

    This Spring is a great time to get some healthy nutrition through green smoothies. Smoothies are fun and easy to make in your blender or nutibullet type of mixer.  An awesome green smoothie is one made with green vegetables and green fruits along with a small amount of antioxidant berries.  By helping the liver and gall bladder be strong, the skin will become clearer and healthier.

    Your Spring challenge is to stand tall, stretch for the heavens and keep your feet grounded to the earth. Join me for our next class on seasonal foods that promote healthy skin!

    Learn more about spring skin solutions at Susan’s workshop, Food and Skin: Spring Detox and Clarity on Saturday, April 13, 1-2pm.  Susan Reddig, B.S. is a licensed esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings, focusing on beautiful skin from the inside out.  www.billingsclinicalskinsolutions.com.


  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Sensitivity | 03.01.2013

    WheatThey’ve become household words, but if someone gluten sensitive was coming to dinner, would you know what to feed him/her?  If you are the one who has been diagnosed with Celiac or gluten sensitivity, do you fully understand the pathology of each? 

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition, meaning the body’s own immune system attacks itself.  Specifically, the immune system attacks the “villi” in the small intestine, the “arms” that reach out and grab nutrients as they pass through the digestive track.  Celiac disease attacks and breaks off the arms.  As a result of malabsorption and depleted nutrients, the body is trying to do normal physiological function on fumes.  

    Celiac disease now affects 1 in 133. Not many years ago, it was a one-page description in the medical text and doctors were told they would rarely see it in practice.  A lot has changed, and fast.

    1 in 8 people with Celiac disease have GI (gastro-intestinal) symptoms:  gas, bloating, diarrhea, nausea, GI pain or cramping.  The other 7 of 8 people may not have any GI symptoms and may present with joint pain, migraines, eczema, irritability, depression, clumsiness, difficulty balancing, neuropathy, infertility, fatigue (including iron or a B-vitamin deficiency), osteoporosis or changes to teeth.  This list can also include weight gain or constipation – opposite of what we’d think when there is malabsorption.  Because the symptoms can affect any organ system, it’s easy to miss.  Symptoms of joint pain are addressed by the rheumatologist while the dentist talks to the patient about oral hygiene. 

    Celiac disease progresses on a spectrum.  A person doesn’t go from healthy to “100% villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia” overnight, stages progress from 1 to 4.  If a person was tested for Celiac disease before Stage 4 is reached, a negative diagnosis might again be given. 

    Are there ramifications of all this negative diagnosis?  You bet!  Many people are out there eating a little or a lot of gluten because they were tested and told they did not have Celiac disease.  Or maybe they never got tested; they just tried a gluten-free trial, felt better and mostly avoid gluten now. 

    The long-term consequence of either of these two scenarios is that individuals “cheat” and they continue to throw fuel on the autoimmune fire.  It’s not the amount of gluten one eats; it’s the fact that gluten is the trigger and fires or “turns on” the immune system, which can set off the immune system for up to six weeks.  If the autoimmune process isn’t turned down or off, the person could expect to have other autoimmune diseases in his/her lifetime!  Cheating isn’t an option.

    If Celiac disease is definitively ruled out via blood tests, a biopsy, and looking for the genetic markers, that is truly good news and the person would now be diagnosed with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity.  While the autoimmune process doesn’t seem to be in play in this diagnosis, eating gluten is still playing with fire.

    Join me for a free workshop on the ins and outs of Celiac and gluten intolerance on Good Earth Market’s Gluten-Free Day Saturday, March 9 from noon-1pm.  All gluten-free products in the store will be 20% off.

    Tracy Konoske, MS RD, holds her Masters degree in Nutrition from Bastyr University, the “Harvard” of natural medicine.  In addition, she has advanced training in functional medicine from the Institute for Functional Medicine.  Tracy has a virtual private practice here in the Billings area – as such, she “sees” patients all over the state of Montana as she helps them identify the root cause of their health condition.  Tracy’s specialties include:  migraines and chronic headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, joint pain including fibromyalgia, and auto immune diseases including Celiac disease.  You can find more information at www.healthylifestylesmt.com.

     

     

     


  • Heart Healthy Red Wines | 02.13.2013

    In this season of love, our thoughts lend themselves to those we care about. While considering their heart, both in the emotional and physical sense, why not include a heart healthy libation to show you care?

    Red wine continues to gain praise as a “heart healthy” beverage.  Red wine contains polyphenols, a variety of antioxidants that have positive test results indicating their benefit for strengthening the immune system, reducing the risk of heart disease, and even preventing cancer. 

    Polyphenols are also responsible for a wine’s flavor profile and texture in your mouth.  The same structure, or tannin*, that helps a red wine age gracefully is one of the main polyphenols benefiting the human body.   In essence, tannin helps both you and the wine age gracefully.

    Resveratrol is one polyphenol in particular that is receiving lots of attention.  It is finding its way into many anti-aging tinctures as well as being credited with reducing inflammation and blood clotting (heart disease). The deep color and high phenol concentration of red wines comes from its extended contact with the skins, pips, and stems of the grape, a process called maceration.

    White wine grapes contain a similar potential for this antioxidant-rich notoriety, but they often times spend far less time macerating and end up absorbing less from the nutrient rich skins and stems.

    Find These Wines at the Co-op

    Lomas del Valle Cabernet Franc:  Cabernet Franc is one of the parent grapes of Cabernet Sauvignon. A tamer version of its offspring, Cab Franc is well suited to cool climates like Chile and the Loire Valley. Flavors include dark berry, black current and violets.

    Wine - MontepulcianoPietrantonji Montepulciano d’Abruzzo:
      This Italian winery dates back to the 1700s and is literally the oldest winery in Abruzzo, doubling as a museum for the area which sits just north of the heel on the eastern coast of Italy. This Montepulciano is made in the traditional style in homage to their ancestors. This wine offers sweet spice flavors of vanilla, anise and dried tobacco in the mouth, with a hint of chocolate on the finish.

    Le Pigolet Rouge:  This French Rhone style blend of 80% Grenache, 10% Syrah, 5% Cinsault and 5% Carignan shows pretty flavors of roasted herbs, smoke, and ripe red fruits and pomegranate. Blended by the Brunier family of Vieux Telegraph fame. 

    *Tannin: Consider the “drying” sensation after swallowing a bite out of an apple or a flathead cherry. Tannin contributes greatly to the way a wine feels in your mouth. It can also find its way into wine via oak barrels.

    Written by Lena Olson of Winegardners Wines.  Learn more at www.winegardnerswines.com.

     


  • Food and Skin: Winter Skin Survival | 01.09.2013

    Replenish, Build, Conserve, Hydrate

    It’s the new year – time to burrow in and begin to replenish the skin, body, mind, and spirit. Winter means shoveling snow, bitter winds, bundling up with layers, and dry, scratchy skin. Winter also is a time for the crackling sound of the fireplace, cuddling up in a warm electric throw, or cooking a favorite soup or stew that will warm the insides and relieve the bone-cold chill.

    In the season of winter, the element is Water and the color is black. Water energy is flowing, deeply internal, and the base of life. Water energy encourages hibernation and self-reflection. One can consider this a time of storing energy and replenishing so that when spring comes there will be bursting of new energy and growth!  Winter skin has a tendency to be dry and itchy. We may notice wrinkles, a pale complexion, dark circles under the eyes, hyper pigmentation, red blotchiness, fluid retention, and clogged congested pores.

    Which is the best way to thrive in winter and save our skin?  First, for survival is the need to honor the winter quietness and stillness that is deep within all, to have a place of fulfillment and peace. Next, eat foods that nourish the Water Element. Some suggestions are watermelon, blackberries, blueberries, eggs, cloves, ginger, cinnamon bark, everything in the onion family, chicken, salmon, caviar and seaweeds. Salty and spicy flavors encourage health, but use sea salt rather than regular table salt. Making soups or stews will be warming and will help us tolerate the frosty days. Soups continue to be easy on the digestive tract, helping the body maintain its quietness. 

    Now for the skin. An excellent supplement for skin health is taking a fish oil supplement and eating non-white fish, like salmon. Fish oil lubricates, helps relieve the winter aches and pains, reduces inflammation, and can help to relieve that dry itchiness. Topically, it is very important that ingredients such as hyaluronic acid are in your moisturizer or lotion. Another soothing skin option right from our kitchen cupboard is olive oil. Nothing could be easier!  Use your olive oil to blend with regular moisturizers, apply right after showering, or add some sugar to exfoliate. Do something fun, like indulging your skin in a berries mask and eating dark chocolate.  Your skin will love you.  And you will love your skin.

    This winter avoid the itchies, the flakies, and the reddies by eating healthy warming soups and foods, applying topical soothing oils, and finding time to retreat for self-reflection, meditation and energy conservation. These simple steps will do more for your skin than you can imagine.  In January of the new year, take the challenge to change your approach of skin health care to nourish your whole person. Winter is the time to Replenish, Conserve, Build, and Hydrate.

    Learn more about winter skin solutions at Susan’s workshop, Food and Skin: Winter Skin Survival on Saturday, January 12, 1-2pm.  Susan Reddig, B.S. is a licensed esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings, focusing on beautiful skin from the inside out.  www.billingsclinicalskinsolutions.com.

     


  • The Staff of Life? Not for Everybody… | 10.11.2012

    How can people become sick from eating wheat?  While wheat and related grains (barley and rye) have been staples of the human diet for thousands of years, there are an increasing number of kids and adults that become sick after eating these grains. There are several distinct reactions that someone can have after eating these grains: Celiac disease, Wheat Allergy and Gluten Sensitivity. They are not the same thing and have different symptoms and dangers.

    What are the differences in these diseases?

    Wheat Allergy is the only reaction to wheat that is a true allergic condition.  It is the same type of allergy people can have to eggs, peanuts, or other foods when their body develops antibodies that react after eating that particular food . The reactions are relatively immediate and can manifest as lip or face swelling, welts(hives), severe itching , breathing difficulties, abdominal cramping and even shock (anaphylaxis). People with severe wheat allergies may need to carry an emergency dose of epinephrine with them in case they are accidentally exposed to it to avoid going into shock. Some children may grow out of a wheat allergy later in life, but it is also possible to develop a new allergy to wheat as an adult.

    Celiac disease (CD) is a completely different condition than wheat allergy involving a different part of your immune system. In this case our immune cells (T-cells) view gluten (the protein in wheat, barley and rye) as the enemy and attack it in the gut. Every time the person with CD eats wheat, the immune system attacks it. Over months to years this attack causes inflammation of the small intestine and damages the intestinal wall making it difficult to absorb vitamins and nutrients.

    The classic story of CD is one of a young child with diarrhea, a big bloated abdomen, and poor growth. This actually represents the minority of cases, as CD can present with a host of symptoms and at any age. Medical experts have dubbed CD as “the great imitator” because it can mimic many other diseases, or like no disease at all. Chronic abdominal pain or constipation, unexplained anemia, brittle bones, chronic rashes, chronic fatigue are all possible ways in which celiac can show up. The older the patient, the less “classic” the presentation of CD. It is estimated that 90% of Celiacs are currently undiagnosed, and delayed diagnoses of years is common.

    Gluten Sensitivity was considered for many years an “alternative medicine” diagnosis but is now being recognized by many western physicians as a real condition. It is different and unique from celiac disease and wheat allergy. It can look very much like celiac disease, with abdominal pain and diarrhea, and many cases of irritable bowel disease are thought to involve gluten sensitivity. Other symptoms of gluten sensitivity include chronic headaches, fatigue, “brain fog” and depression. 

    Are these diseases really rare?

    Not at all! Current estimates are that 1% of the population has Celiac Disease, 0.5-1% has wheat allergy and as many as 6% of Americans may be “gluten sensitive”. That means as many as 1 person in 12 may be getting sick from wheat and not even realize it! All allergic diseases are becoming more common for reasons we don’t understand, so these numbers are likely to keep rising. It is very likely that someone you know has some type of negative reaction to wheat.

    Am I at risk for getting one of these diseases?

    People at higher risk for having or developing celiac disease include those with immediate relatives with celiac, people with Down or Turner Syndrome, Type 1 diabetics, and persons with thyroid or other autoimmune disease.  Type 2 diabetes does not increase your risk. If you or someone you know has one of these conditions, they should be screened regularly for CD. Anyone with chronic gastrointestinal complaints (abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating, constipation, IBS) or unexplained anemia or brittle bones should be screened as well.

    How do I get screened?

    Talk to your doctor. There is a simple blood test called a tissue transglutaminase or TTG that is 95% accurate in diagnosing CD. Confirmation of the diagnosis may require an endoscopy, which is a small flexible tube used to look at and take tiny samples (biopsies) of the first part of the small intestine to look at under the microscope. A positive blood test and evidence of intestinal damage on biopsy confirms CD.

    Wheat allergy is diagnosed by a blood test for IgE (immunoglobulin E) to wheat, and/or by a skin test using a small amount of wheat protein to see if the body reacts when wheat is scratched into the skin.

    There is no accurate blood or skin test for gluten sensitivity even though expensive tests are advertised. The best and only way to diagnose it is to remove all wheat, barley and rye from the diet for at least 2 weeks. If symptoms improve, and then reappear when wheat is added back to the diet, the diagnosis is made. It is completely safe to remove all wheat and related foods from the diet.

    How do you treat these diseases?

    Essentially the only treatment for all three is a gluten free and wheat free diet. There are now more gluten free foods available than ever before, and labels are now stating if a product is gluten free. There are numerous health food stores in Billings and across Montana that carry a variety of gluten free foods.

    For more information about celiac and gluten free questions, here are some resources:  www.montanaceliacsociety.com    www.gluten.net   www.cdhnf.org 

    Tom Flass MS, MD is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist with St Vincent Healthcare, and treats conditions of the digestive tract and liver in Children. He completed medical training in Denver at the Children’s Hospital Colorado and has a Master’s degree in Human Nutrition from Colorado State University. Tom has celiac disease and has been gluten free for 18 years.


  • My Gluten-Free Story by Carl Solberg | 09.12.2012

    Some twenty years ago, my frail, emaciated 120 pound frame forced me to struggle. Forcing myself, I would vomit several times getting into the car to drive to work. Usual activities, like mowing the grass, were very difficult. I would make one pass with the lawnmower and have to go inside and rest. Numerous tests showed nothing unusual, until a family practice physician finally told me, “I don’t know what is wrong, I suspect it is something in your diet, but we’ll send you to someone who can find out.” That someone happened to be Dr. Mark Rumans of the Deaconess Billings Clinic.

    Carl SolbergDr. Rumans diligently completed his routine exam and scheduled a colonoscopy. His findings indicated that I had celiac disease. Dr. Rumans told me, “Lay off the bread and you will do just fine.” At this time much less was known about celiac disease, and I thought it was a rather rare disorder. I thought that I simply needed to cut back on my foods containing gluten. Thinking I was doing what was best, as long as gluten wasn’t the main ingredient in a food, I thought it would be fine if I consumed a little gluten. In fact, I wasn’t sure what gluten even was.

    I cut back on eating gluten, but many baked foods were too inviting. I had the belief that eventually my body would again be able to tolerate gluten, but I simply had to give myself time to heal.

    My gluten-ignorant life continued until I was diagnosed with an agent-orange related cancer from my previous Vietnam military duty. The surgery caused my body to again react. My celiac disease again “raised it ugly head.”

    Some understanding co workers noticed my extreme agony and saved my life by taking me immediately to the Deaconess Billings Clinic. My body felt like it was on fire. At first I brushed it off by thinking that my problem would go away just as quickly as it started. By the time I reached the Deaconess Billings Clinic, I was too weak to transfer with out assistance from a wheel chair to an examining table. It felt as if there was a civil war going on inside me. After some testing, the ER physician said, “I am not sure what is going on down there, but I see a lot of inflammation so we are going to have to take you upstairs for immediate surgery.” It took anesthesia to relieve my intense pain.

    After surgery, medical staff at the Deaconess Billings Clinic discovered that gluten had eaten a hole about the size of a pencil eraser in my small intestine. Surgeons removed several inches of intestine and spliced it up again. They did their best to control the peritonitis that ravaged my body. No food or drink allowed for days. I was told that if there was a problem, having food or drink could be fatal. No ice chips, no coffee, no nothing.  This Norwegian likes to have his coffee, but all was forbidden.

    Recovering at Deaconess Billings Clinic gave me some time to think. My first thoughts were, “I am going to quit leading a gluten-ignorant life.” While recuperating at home, I spent my days on the internet, trying to learn as much as I could about celiac disease and I tried to learn how I could learn to live a healthy gluten-free life. During my internet search I made some telephone contacts. When I was strong enough to get out of the house, I made some personal visits in my attempt to become more knowledgeable.

    During one of my computer searches I found Montana Celiac Society on the internet and made a call to Jean Powell, the founder of the organization. She asked if I was interested in helping start a gluten-free support group inBillings. When she mentioned this, I was delighted knowing that others should never have to suffer the pain I had just suffered. I was hours away from death, and no one should have to go through that agony.

    Now, feeling stronger, I made more contacts and more phone calls. The subject of all these conversations was always gluten – what is gluten-free and how can I learn more about ways I can stay healthy?

    During my search in ways to stay healthy, I came in contact with a very knowledgeable staff person at Montana Harvest Health Food Store on 17th & Grand Avenue. This exceptional person, Joan Dannenberg, was very “gluten-smart.” We talked gluten-free healthy foods and places to purchase these foods. Our conversation soon turned to the subject of working on a gluten-free support group in our area. I could see Joan’s enthusiasm grow, and some weeks later we had our first support group meeting on a Saturday sitting in chairs in the middle of the gluten-free aisle at Montana Harvest. Joan and my goals were similar in nature. We both had an extreme desire to reach out to others and provide support and education for others who needed to live a gluten-free life in order to stay healthy.

    Our “gluten-free walk” continued, our enthusiasm for educating others who suffered our health issues began to grow in numbers. We teamed up with Montana Celiac Society for advice and direction, and shortly thereafter we became members of the board and assisted serving in leadership positions.

    Before realizing what was happening, our gluten-free support group, which was first sparked by my near death, had now reached places outside of Billings.  Montana Celiac Society had a goal of bringing Dr. Allesso Fasano to Billings to speak at the Deaconess Billings Clinic. Our group rolled up it sleeves and went to work to see that Dr. Fassano could come. We realized that having the physician who heads up the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland would be a huge asset to all of us. It would take money to do this, but that would not keep us from accomplishing this task. In the end, Dr. Fasano made a presentation at a packed conference room at the Deaconess Billings Clinic. Our group spent an eventful evening with Dr. Fasano and he was given a generous check by our organization to be used for celiac research.

    Since its beginning in Billings, our leadership and members of our support group have placed educating members as its number one goal. In so doing, it always adheres to having programs which are highly worthwhile to everyone in attendance. In keeping up with these principles and goals, we have assisted people with gluten issues in Kalispell and have worked with them to start a gluten free support group. A number of Support Group people from Billings recently  attended Kalispell’s first meeting. More than 50 people in Kalispell attended their first meeting. There were 74 people attending Kalispell’s last gluten free educational presentation. My goal is to now get similar support groups started in Missoula, Great Falls and other places in Montana. Why do we do this? We do this because I nearly died from gluten. Deaconess Billings Clinic saved my life, and no one should ever have to lead a gluten-ignorant life and experience the extreme pain that I had by not following a gluten-free diet.

    Stay tuned for our monthly gluten-free blog!  So what is this thing called Celiac Disease? I shall try to explain in layman’s terms in my next blog, “A Hidden Killler”.

    Carl Solberg, president of the Montana Celiac Society, is passionate about educating people on a gluten-free lifestyle.  The Montana Celiac Society offers information and support to those with Celiac disease, hosting conventions and regular support group meetings and providing other resources.  For more information, visit their website at www.montanaceliacsociety.com.  Stay tuned right here for a monthly blog from the Montana Celiac Society!


  • Heal Your Skin with Fall Foods | 09.10.2012

    Do you know that food is good for the skin inside and outside? When I look at seasonal foods that are beneficial for the skin, I love to find new ways to integrate nature’s Elements into a skin care routine. These Elements are connected to the seasons that influence our foods and our bodies.  Learning how to choose a seasonal food for topical use in order to produce smooth and healthier skin appearance can motivate all of us towards a healthier lifestyle.  

    Soup for Sagging Skin

    Our skin transitions through the seasons and we may find we need to use a different product or have a clinical facial to boost the cellular process.  The transition period, according to some traditions, is called the Earth Element.  During the late summer, we experience a brief pause between the high energy of summer and the hot sun to shorter days and cooler nights.  The Earth Element is associated with the colors yellow and orange -foods like pumpkin, squash, butternut squash, yellow peppers, peaches, nectarines, papaya, pineapple, mangoes, and corn benefit the bodily organs of Earth, the spleen/pancreas and stomach.  The fall has a tendency to see dry and scaly skin as the skin may not be exfoliating fast enough and the metabolism of the skin may be slow. The Earth Element manifests itself around the mouth and a weak Earth Element (digestion) shows up on the face as sagging eyelids and jowls, and loose skin under the chin.

    So, help! It looks like my Earth Element is sagging!  What can I do?   Here is a list of spices and seasonal foods that can help to tonify and warm the earth (digestion): ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, fennel, and nutmeg.  Fall foods that can be added to your meals are carrots, sweet potatoes, parsnips, turnips, pumpkin, rutabagas, onion, leeks, and barley.  The best way to eat these foods are cooked and made into a soup.  Soups are comfort food, since they are easy on the digestive track.

    We  now have a basic understanding of what foods to eat from the Earth season that will help from the inside.  So which food would be a great all around topical treat to give our skin that healthy glow we are all looking for?  I definitely have a favorite.  It is a food that has multiple uses and functions all season long.  It is high in vitamin C, Vitamin A, anti-oxidants, enzymes that exfoliate, has emollients, phospholipids, Vitamin B,  Salicylic Acid, sugar, zinc, and on and on.  This food has an amazing oil that is awesome for the skin. 

    To discover this exemplary food that is nutritious for our body inside and outside, join me for the first in a seasonal series of “Food and Skin” workshops, “Fall Foods that Promote Healthy Skin“, (Saturday, September 15th at 1 p.m.).  I will share recipes and provide tastings for Soup for Sagging Skin and a facial/body mask.  This workshop explores foods harvested in the fall that we can use to help manage problematic or aging skin.

     Susan Reddig,  B.S., is a Licensed Esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings .

     


  • Simple Stress Management | 08.08.2012

    Stress. We all know it, most of us are ‘under’ it, and we all want to get rid of it. Stress can result from many things, such as deadlines at work, pain, emotional upsets, illness, postural burden and even genetics.  Left unattended, you may begin to notice increased heart rate, loss of sleep, and even anxiety.

    As the body is subjected to prolonged stress, systems can begin to breakdown and malfunction. Your energy becomes depleted, you become fatigued and depressed. Protracted exposure to stress can increase blood pressure, disrupt digestion, instigate skin reactions, as well as affect weight gain or loss. Stress can disrupt the nervous system, causing neurotransmitter imbalances. This can lead to feelings of sadness, headaches and memory interruption or loss.

    Chiropractor Pat Holl with a PatientIf you’re experiencing stress in your life, there are positive ways to deal with it. Remember to eat healthy food regularly, preferably organic as no amount of supplementation replaces a healthy diet. Drink lots of water to help flush toxins through your body and help reduce the risk of disease and infection. Exercise and stretch, as movement enhances blood flow to the brain, promotes the flow of body fluids and improves metabolism. And whatever form of ‘calming’ you choose, whether you meditate, pray, or sing, remember to plug that ingredient in.  Stress is often invariable in today’s world, but it can be managed.

    Guest blogger Dr. Patricia Holl, DC, chiropractor at Yellowstone Naturopathic Clinic, has more than a decade of experience in her field.  Learn more on her blog, “Pat on the Back“.


  • Protecting Your Skin | 07.24.2012

    Alba Suncare products are ON SALE for $6.99 through July 31. Regular price $9.99.

    Summer poses great challenges with managing our skin care. We love the warm sun and how comforting it feels on our skin. We feel the freedom of unencumbered movement due to less clothing or, at the least, lighter weight clothing. The smell of fresh air seduces us out from behind our walls of our homes or places of work.  Oh, it feels so good to be free!

    How do we enjoy the sun, which is natural and integral to the function of life, yet protect ourselves from its dangerous and life-threatening rays? The first way to protect ourselves is to be well informed of the types of ultraviolet rays and how they affect our skin.  The second way is to educate ourselves on what the SPF ratings really mean. The third way is to know what ingredients are most effective.

    Understanding the UV Rays
    UVA = Aging, UVB = Burning and cancer.   We know there are two main ultraviolet rays that we need to be aware of. They are the UVA and UVB rays. UVA rays have less energy, but penetrate deeper into the skin, causing damage to the connective tissue and creating aging, sun spots, hyper pigmentation, wrinkles, and leathery skin. UVA is always emitting, even on cloudy days. These rays increase the risk of skin cancer.

    Susan out for a ride. Pay attention to exposed areas!

    UVB rays are damaging, but only on the surface. Don’t let that fool you. UVB rays are the burning, redness, sunburn, blistering, and dryness that often causes skin cancer. They are strongest during the mid-day and are able to reflect off of water and snow.

    What’s SPF?
    SPF ratings can be confusing and are relevant only to the UVB rays. SPF is a measure of how sunscreen works against UVB rays. We are prone to think that the higher a reading is, the more protection there is. In reality, the higher rating diminishes in effectiveness. The difference between SPF levels gets small as the numbers go higher. For instance, the difference between 15 and 30 is bigger than between 30 and 45, therefore, using an SPF of 45 is not much more effective than SPF 30.

    Which ingredients should you look for?

    • Look for sun protection that includes zinc oxide. Zinc Oxide is a physical block and is the most effective. Titanium Dioxide, is also a physical block but less effective than zinc oxide, and Avobenzone is a chemical screen. Both Zinc Oxide and Titanium Dioxide are the most important to have in the list.
    • Look for the words “Broad Spectrum”. A Broad Spectrum will protect from both the UVA and UVB rays.

    Local suncare products are healthy for your skin.

    The best way to apply sunblock is very liberal. Some doctors say to be a “grease monkey”. Reapply every two hours and, if you are in the water, apply every hour. Wearing a hat and other protective clothing is advised.  And don’t forget the little areas, such as, ears, back of neck, tops of feet, and scalp.

    That area of skin that didn’t get covered? Add the back of hands to the list of little areas. Ouch!

    Susan Reddig, B.S., L.E., is a licensed esthetician and owner of Clinical Skincare Solutions. located at 2900 12th Avenue North.


  • Einkorn “Blender” Pancakes | 06.20.2012

    Einkorn wheat has been around for a very long time—this tough-husked wheat was cultivated in its earliest form around 10,000 years ago near the Fertile Crescent.  Einkorn is considered to be the oldest known domesticated wheat and thrives in conditions that other wheat does not.  Its durability, however, has not prevented it from becoming scarcely cultivated for close to 2,000 years.

    So why is Dr. Oz talking about Einkorn wheat now, in 2012?  Why am I learning about Einkorn in my webinars some 10,000 years later?  As it turns out, the Mesopotamians were on to something, whether they understood gluten toxicity or not. 

    The gluten protein in Einkorn isn’t as harmful as gluten in other wheat to those suffering from celiac disease, and the reason may lie in the fact that the gliadin in Einkorn is chromosomally different from the gluten in modern wheat.  Researchers suggest that this very basic difference in gluten structure may even have a profound positive impact on the way those with celiac disease feel.  Of course, if you have gluten intolerance or celiacs, make sure you check with your doctor before eating Einkorn, as it still has gluten.  Watch this video from the Dr. Oz Show talking about how much he loves Einkorn (at 2:30 minutes). 

    Since this grain is not only a new product to me, but new to GEM as well, I figured I better taste it!  My options were either Jovial Foods organic pasta, or Einkorn whole grains in bulk.  I chose to make Einkorn pancakes from the whole grain.  Pancakes are delicious, and they can be healthy, too.  I found a multitude of recipe options online for everything Einkorn, so if pancakes don’t work for you, jump online or call me at the Market for some other ideas.  

     

    Healthy Whole Grain Einkorn “Blender” Pancakes

    Ingredients

    • 2 C. whole Einkorn grain kernels (from the bulk department)
    • 2 1/2 C. water
    • 1/2 C. powdered milk (from the bulk department)
    • 2 eggs (local, free range)
    • 4 T. expeller pressed coconut oil (Spectrum)
    • 2 T. raw, unfiltered honey (Drange Apiary,Laurel,MT)
    • 1 t. sea salt (Real Salt from the bulk department)
    • 2 T. aluminum-free baking powder

    Directions

    1.  In blender (I used a Magic Bullet, which I’d never used before, but it was the perfect size for this recipe and worked well), combine the Einkorn grain kernels, water, and powdered milk on high for 5 minutes for a smooth mix.  For those that like to the texture of a larger grain, blend for about 3 minutes.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2.  Add egg, oil, honey and salt. Blend for 20 seconds.  Depending on your blender, you may need to  blend for 45 seconds.

    3.  Add baking powder gradually, 1 tablespoon at a time. Pulse three times, just enough to mix. Mixture should foam up and get very light.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    4.  Cook immediately on a hot, nonstick griddle.  If you don’t have a non-stick, put a little oil in the pan to prevent sticking and add a nice moistness to the pancakes.

     

    This recipe makes about 10 pancakes and they turned out perfectly!  The consistency and density reminded me of cornmeal pancakes, with less sweetness.  The butter and maple syrup absorbed into the pancake, and I’m sure it’d be easy to add blueberries or any seasonal fruit into the mix before cooking! These cakes take no time at all to prepare and they’re healthy, being made with whole grains and sweetened with honey.

    I ate seven pancakes.  My wife ate three.

    by Dan Davis, GEM’s Bulk Buyer


  • Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity – not just tummy trouble! | 05.31.2012

    by Tracy Konoske, MS, RD  
    Nutritionist & Registered Dietitian

     

    Get your gluten-free questions answered by Tracy Konoske at our Gluten-Free Day, June 16!

    History of anemia?
    Losing bone mineral density?
    Suffer from joint or bone pain?  Arthritis?
    Already diagnosed with an auto-immune disease like Hashimoto’s thyroid, Type 1 Diabetes, auto-immune hepatitis, or auto-immune liver disease?
    Dental enamel defects?
    Constipation?  Diarrhea? 
    Infertile?  Menstrual irregularities?  Miscarriages?
    Recurrent canker sores?
    Skin lesions that aren’t really acne? 
    Migraines?
    Depression?
    Weight loss?  Weight gain? 
    Fatigue that napping just doesn’t solve?
    Does your child have failure to thrive? 

    Quite a list isn’t it?  It’s broad enough that almost anyone would answer “yes” to one or two answers.  That’s because Celiac disease is now known to affect one in 133 people.  It’s estimated that 3 million people have it, but only 5-10% are diagnosed

    The symptoms are broad as it can affect any or every organ system.  No one knows which part of the medical text to put it in anymore because it is not just a GI (gastro-intestinal) disease.   50% of newly diagnosed Celiacs had NO GI symptoms!

    Why is it spreading like wildfire?
    Well, it’s not because we’re better at diagnosing it.  Researcher Dr. Murray took stored blood from Army recruits, analyzed it, and found age-matched controls.  According to him, Celiac disease has increased four-fold in the past 50 years.  Celiac expert Dr. Fasano found that it’s doubling every 15 years and a five-fold increase. 

    Some proposed answers are leaky gut, GMO foods, composition of our gut bacteria, and more gluten in our food supply than in the past. 

    It takes a perfect storm to brew Celiac.  First, one must have one of the two genes and 30-40% of our population does.   Second, it takes a trigger, which is usually a stressful event, that temporarily alters gut permeability.  Examples are puberty, food borne illness, pregnancy, trauma either emotional or physical, or just becoming elderly.  Third, exposure to gluten.  Which now is in just about everything you eat, so the with our stressful lives, and high exposure…the conditions are ripe.   

    What about all those non-Celiac folks who feel better on a gluten-free diet?
    Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) affects 6% of our population and the only test is to rule out Celiac disease, and then do a trial gluten-free diet. 

    The caveat is that it is important to do due diligence and rule out Celiac first.  Many go on a gluten-free diet and don’t bother with the testing.  What’s wrong with that?  Celiac is an auto-immune disease.  It comes with real-life complications, including a risk of other auto-immune diseases, anemia, lymphoma’s, bone loss and more.  We are still sorting out the truth but NCGS has not been known to be an auto immune disease although that is now changing.  But, having the facts in place allows us as health care providers to treat and heal you accordingly.  Guessing if you are risk for complications isn’t a good way to practice medicine. 

    The Bottom Line
    If you take the 1% of our population who has Celiac, and the 6% who are NCGS, we have 21 million people who will feel better being gluten-free for life!  No wonder this is such big business!!!

    Gluten-free diets help many, many people, but anyone messing with the foundation of life should have expert help to avoid nutrient deficiencies and minimize complications later in life.  The goal is to heal, not do more harm.  There’s a lot to know and it’s not a field one can dabble in. 

    Tracy Konoske has a virtual private practice.  She’s a different kind of dietitian and gets a different kind of result with her patients.  She offers Medical Nutrition Therapy for those with chronic disease, including Celiac and NCGS.   Join Tracy for a FREE workshop, “Celiac, Gluten Sensitivity and the Gluten-Free Diet” on our Gluten-Free Day, Saturday, June 16.  Visit Tracy’s website at www.healthylifestylesmt.com  


  • What’s the deal with raspberry ketone? | 04.05.2012

    From Dolly, GEM Wellness Guru

    I’m sure many of you have heard of it by now – raspberry ketone, as seen on the Dr. Oz Show, seems to be the new miracle fat-burner, the cure-all for those stubborn spots. Here’s some great info that I found helpful and I hope you will too!

    According to supplement company Wellgenix, raspberry ketone “is the primary aroma compound of red raspberries, and is a safe and healthy supplement with no side effects. This compound regulates adiponectin, a hormone that causes your body to boost metabolism. In turn, the fat within your cells gets broken up more effectively, helping your body burn fat faster and more efficiently. In order to get enough ketone to have an effect on the way your body burns excess fat, you would need to consume 90 pounds of raspberries! But, just 100mg of the supplement per day is enough to get your body burning fat the way you want it to.”

    Here’s more – the ingredients list on the new hormone-free HCG Amino Support + Raspberry Ketones boasts a nice range of metabolism boosting amino acids, along with herbal support for the immune system, stress reduction, and energy production.

    I wanted to share these simple facts and tidbits with you, and let you know that we now have this product in stock now in the Wellness Department!

     

    Photo Courtesy of zole4.