Category: Recipes

  • Stella’s Favorite Stuffing Recipe | 11.17.2015

    An iconic restaurant and bakery, Stella’s Kitchen & Bakery has been providing our community with delicious breads and pastries for many years. Look for Stella’s Stuffing Bread in the weeks before Thanksgiving and try her easy, delicious recipe for homemade stuffing! (Recipe is also printed on each bag of Stella’s Stuffing Bread.)

    Stella’s Favorite Stuffing

    ½ c. butter
    1 c. chopped onion
    2 c. chopped celery
    2 tsp. salt
    ½ tsp. pepper
    1 tsp. poultry seasoning
    1 8oz. can mushrooms
    1 pkg. Stella’s Stuffing Bread
    2 Tblsp. Chopped parsley

    Melt butter in skillet. Add onion, celery and seasonings. Cook until onion and celery are tender. Drain mushrooms, reserving liquid and heat to boiling. Add vegetable mixture to mushrooms, bread crumbs and parsley. Add mushroom liquid and toss lightly until well mixed. Use to stuff a 16-18 lb. turkey.

    Recipe reprinted with permission from Stella’s Kitchen & Bakery.


  • Fall Foods for the Whole Family | 08.24.2014

    SquashFall is back-to-school time as well as harvest time for a variety of super nutritious fruits and vegetables. Why not send your kids back to the classroom full of the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants their bodies will need to stay healthy as cold season sets in?

    Squashes are among the cheapest and easiest fall fruits to prepare, and they pack a powerhouse of nutrients, including potassium, carotenoids, folate, and fiber. Best of all, they are both kid friendly and baby friendly, being a great food for infants.

    To prepare squash, simply split any variety (acorn, butternut, pumpkin, spaghetti) down the middle with a large knife, scoop out the seeds, place the halves flesh-side down in a pan with ½-inch of water, and bake at 350 degree for 45-60 minutes. The squash is done when a knife sinks easily into the flesh. To serve, scoop out the flesh and add butter and cinnamon to taste.

    A high-quality butter from pastured animals will add Vitamins A and K2 to your dish as well as a healthy dose of saturated fat. Wait a minute, did I use healthy and saturated fat in the same sentence? Yes! Research is chipping away at the myth that saturated fat is bad, when in fact both saturated fat and cholesterol are essential for growth and development. See westonaprice.org for a wealth of information on the benefits of fat and other nutrient-dense foods—or do a Google search for the recent spate of articles in the news!

    Spaghetti squash can be a fun food for kids since it looks like, well, spaghetti! After baking, scrape out the flesh with a fork and serve with butter, salt, and pepper, or with a little pasta sauce and Parmesan cheese.

    Fall is also harvest time for that universal symbol of education, the apple. Making homemade applesauce or apple butter can be a fun project for the whole family, and can spare your kids the high-fructose corn syrup and other sweeteners added to commercial products.

    To make your own applesauce, simply cut apples into 1-inch chunks (no need to remove the skin—it has lots of nutrition!), sprinkle with cinnamon, and steam for about 10 minutes, or until the apples are soft. Place steamed chunks into a food processor and puree with a few squeezes of lemon juice. You can also add a tablespoon or two of virgin coconut oil for extra flavor and nutrition.

    For apple butter, place 10-20 sliced apples in a slow cooker with an inch of water (again, no need to remove the skin). Sprinkle with a generous amount of allspice and cinnamon and cook on low for 8-10 hours, checking periodically to make sure there is enough water in the bottom of the cooker to prevent burning. Puree the apples with the remaining water using a stick blender (or transfer to a food processor), adding a tablespoon or two of vanilla extract as you blend. If it’s too thick, add small amounts of water until you achieve the right consistency.

    Enjoy!

    Cori Hart is the local chapter leader for the Weston A. Price Foundation, committed to reintroducing nutrient-dense foods into the Standard American Diet. She can be reached at eatwell.livwell@gmail.com.


  • Vegan Chocolate Mousse | 03.23.2014

    Avocado Mousse (1 of 3)  I found this recipe the other day and posted it to our Facebook page. As I was sharing I thought to myself, “How could this taste good?!” which prompted me to go ahead and make Vegan Chocolate Mousse! (recipe is found below)

    The list of ingredients includes: avocado, cocoa powder, agave nectar, vanilla extract, and almond milk. I  grabbed some Organic Avocados from GEM’s produce section and decided to substitute the Agave Nectar with Local Honey- Becky’s Berries Montana Creamed Honey with Huckleberries to be exact.

    FYI: We carry this delicious honey and I love mixing it in with my morning bowl of oatmeal!

    This recipe is incredibly easy and takes less than 10 minutes from start to finish!

     

     

    Avocado Mousse (2 of 3)I compiled the required five ingredients, threw them into my early 1940’s Hamilton Beach mixer and let it puree the food into a thick, rich chocolate.

    I cautiously dipped my finger in for a taste to see what the heck I just created. This quickly led to spooning half the mixture into a cup and devouring the mousse! It was SO good! It was so good that I ate way too much, ultimately leading to quiet time on the couch until my stomach uh.. settled down.. (Sort of like eating a lot of cookie dough while making the cookies and then you have to lay down while the cookies are in the oven. Or am I the only one who does this?..)

     

     

    I got fancy and put my portion in one of my grandmother's cut glass tea cups.

    I got fancy and put my portion in one of my grandmother’s cut glass tea cups.

    If you are serving this as a stand-alone dessert, the recipe is good for two servings. If you are using it as a topping, you should be able to top off about 6-8 servings. Either way, it’s quite yummy.

    Vegan Chocolate Mousse:

    1 ripe avodcado

    1/4 cup cocoa powder

    1/4 cup raw agave nectar (I used creamed honey)

    1/4 cup almond milk (I used SoDelicious unsweetned Coconut Milk – it’s my fave and we have it at GEM in a half gallon in the refrigerated section)

    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    Puree until smooth. Serve chilled.

    Jodie, Marketing Manager

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


  • Eat Seasonally: Sprouts | 12.25.2013

    sprouts Sprouts are that rare superfood that hits the sweet spot between flavor and nutrition. In addition to classic alfalfa sprouts, look for zesty radish, peppery broccoli or savory onion sprouts, as well as crisp and crunchy mung bean sprouts.

    At Good Earth Market, local producer The Growing Business, owned by Daphne Zortman, provides us these delicious greens. Daphne started growing sprouts with her sister back in 1984, and she’s still the type of person who likes to get in there and get her hands dirty. She enjoys eating her own sprouts and is convinced of their powerful health benefits. “They’re a powerhouse of nutrients,” she exclaims, adding that her sprouts are very natural, too, being grown in well water and then cleaned – there’s very little processing that goes on.

    It’s hard to improve on the classic sandwich combo of turkey, avocado and sprouts, but how about radish sprouts, fresh goat cheese, and tomato on multigrain bread? Or onion sprouts, cream cheese and cucumber on rye? Sprouts go beyond sandwiches, too – use mild-flavored mung bean sprouts to garnish everything from stir-fries to soups.

     

    Quick Vegetable Bibimbap
    This recipe is a delicious signature Korean dish, literally meaning “mixed rice”.
    Serves 6, ready in 1 hour

    Dish

    • 1 cup uncooked medium-grain brown rice
    • 1 tsp sesame oil
    • 1 tsp vegetable oil
    • 1 c. carrots, cut into matchsticks
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1 c. zucchini, cut into matchsticks
    • ¼ lb button mushrooms, thickly sliced
    • 6 oz fresh spinach
    • 4 green onions, sliced
    • ½ lb baked or fried tofu, cut into 1-2 inch squares
    • 1 c. cucumber, cut into matchsticks
    • 2 oz mung bean sprouts
    • Pinch of salt
    • Pinch of ground black pepper
    • 6 large eggs

    Sauce

    • ¼ c. hot sauce (Gochujang, Sriracha or other hot chili paste)2 tsp tamari
    • 1 T. water
    • 1 tsp. sugar
    • 1 tsp. rice vinegar
    • ½ tsp sesame seeds

    Start cooking the rice according to package directions. In a small bowl, mix together all sauce ingredients. Set aside.
    In a wok or large skillet, heat the sesame and vegetable oil over medium-high heat. Add carrots and stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add garlic, zucchini, and mushrooms and stir-fry for another 2-3 minutes. Add spinach, and stir-fry just until it’s wilted and tender (about a minute). Remove from heat and toss the vegetables with the tofu, cucumber, bean sprouts, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Set aside vegetables, and fry 6 eggs over easy.
    To serve, place a scoop of rice in each bowl, top with some stir-fried vegetables, place a cooked egg on top, and garnish with sliced green onions. Serve the sauce on the side for drizzling.

    Reprinted by permission from StrongerTogether.coop.  Find articles about your food and where it comes from, recipes, and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.


  • Eat Seasonally: Sweet Potatoes | 11.20.2013

    1113_table_tents_final_2

    One of nature’s simple pleasures, the humble sweet potato brings healthy, wholesome sweetness to home-cooked meals.  Sweet potatoes are nutty, smooth and full of beta carotene, vitamin C and fiber.  Bake small sweet potatoes whole (like baking potatoes) and top with scallions, sour cream, crumbled bacon or sautéed mushrooms for a flavorful alternative to an old favorite;  or try something new and add steamed, cubed sweet potato to a coconut milk-peanut curry over rice.  For updated comfort food, try a Cuban-style pork stew with seared poblano chilies and chunks of rich sweet potato in place of, or in addition to, regular potato.

    Go to www.strongertogether.coop for more tips and hints on using seasonal veggies.

    Yam What I Am
    Try this twist on a holiday staple.  Spicy and tangy, this salad is ready-to-eat  in our Deli Café!

    Serves 6
    Ready in 1 hour

    • 3 lbs. garnet yams, peeled and cut into ½” to ¾” cubes
    • 8 garlic cloves
    • 1/3 c. olive oil
    • 1 pinch dry chipotle pepper (or more to taste)
    • 1/3 c. brown rice vinegar
    • 1 c. pecans
    • 3/4 c. dried cranberries
    • 1 bunch green onions, diced

    Preheat oven to 350 F.  Combine cubed yams, garlic and olive oil in a roasting pan and bake until yams are soft, but not mushy (about 40 minutes).  Drain and retain olive oil and garlic cloves.  Combine garlic, olive oil, and chipotle peppers in food processor or blender and blend until well-mixed.  Add garlic mixture and all other ingredients to yams and mix well.

    We still have lots of local squash and pumpkins rolling in of all sizes, shapes and colors!


  • Wheat-free Cupcakes | 11.01.2013

    Wheat-free_Vanilla_Cupcakes_FB

     

    Total Time: 40 minutes
    Servings: 12 regular or 24 mini cupcakes

    Ingredients

    • 2 eggs (room temperature)
    • 2 tablespoons vanilla extract
    • 6 ounces unsalted butter, melted
    • 1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon sugar
    • 3/4 cup wheat-free flour mix
    • 1 tablespoon salt
    • 1 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    • 3 tablespoons milk

    Preparation

    1. Preheat oven to 325º F.
    2. In a mixing bowl, blend the melted butter with the eggs and vanilla, then mix in the sugar.
    3. In a separate mixing bowl, combine the wheat-free flour mix, salt, baking powder and baking soda and mix well.
    4. Slowly add the dry mixture to the wet ingredients, mixing well, then add the milk and blend to a smooth consistency. Scoop or pipe the batter into a prepared cupcake pan lined with paper liners. Bake at 325 degrees F. for 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool to room temperature before icing.

    Co+op Kitchen recipe by Philip Speer, also available at StrongerTogether.coop. Find more recipes and information about your food and where it comes from at www.strongertogether.coop.


  • Tips for Great Grilling | 07.03.2013

    SONY DSC

    Are you ready to take your grilling skills to new heights? Here are a few tips: Use a blend of spices, salt and herbs as a rub for grilled meat, fish, or tofu. Blends like Cajun, jerk, or tandoori spices add color, crunch and flavor.

    Marinades are another great way to spice up grilled foods. A basic marinade starts with oil, a sour element, and salt or seasoning. Tempeh and halloumi cheese are unusual bases for a tasty marinade, and great on the grill.

    Hit the sweet spot with grilled fruit, like bananas, peaches, nectarines or fresh figs. Just cut them in half, lightly coat with oil, and grill just a few minutes per side. Grilled fruit is amazing with ice cream.

     

    Grilled Vegetables with Tomato Apple Chutney

    Servings: 6
    Prep time: 50 minutes

    · 2 T. vegetable oil
    · 1/3 c. yellow onion, diced
    · 1 ½ t. fresh ginger, peeled and minced
    · 2 cloves garlic, minced
    · 1 t. brown mustard seeds
    · ½ t. ground cumin
    · ½ t. salt
    · 3 large tomatoes, seeded and diced
    · 1 small apple, peeled and diced
    · 1 T. apple cider vinegar
    · Black pepper to taste

    · 2 pounds of mixed vegetables (zucchini, yellow squash, peppers, mushrooms, eggplant, potatoes, fennel, onions in any combination), cut in 2- to 4-inch pieces
    · Vegetable oil
    · Salt & pepper to taste

    To make the chutney, heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a medium-sized saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion and ginger for a few minutes and then add the garlic and mustard seeds; sauté for 2 more minutes. Add the cumin, salt, tomatoes, apple, vinegar and a pinch of black pepper. Stir well, turn the heat down to low, and simmer for 20-30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Remove from heat and reserve. The chutney may be made up to 7 days in advance; keep leftover chutney refrigerated for up to a week.

    To grill vegetables, preheat grill to medium-high. Drizzle the chopped vegetables lightly with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill the vegetables a few minutes on each side until cooked to desired tenderness. Serve with warm tomato chutney.

    Serving suggestion: For an easy summertime meal, serve the grilled veggies with couscous or brown basmati rice, or use to top a pizza or foccacia bread.

    Visit strongertogether.coop for great recipes for rubs, marinades, and our “Fruit and Veggie Grilling Guide,” and find how-to videos at strongertogether.coop/coop-kitchen.”

     

     


  • Eat Seasonally: Strawberries | 06.06.2013

    Sliced red strawberry fruitStrawberries are one of the most-anticipated fruits of the summer; they are sweet, fragrant, and juicy, with a flavor that is unmistakable.  These berries might be small but they are packed with vitamin C and five different antioxidant compounds, which means they are a natural choice for a healthy diet.  It’s easy to use such tasty fruit; simply wash, slice, and top with whipped cream or vanilla yogurt for a simple dessert, or make a divine topping for ice cream and pancakes by stewing fresh strawberries, your favorite sweetener, and diced rhubarb until tender and falling apart. Don’t forget drinks:  frozen strawberries compliment beverages from lemonade to champagne!

    Peppered Strawberries with Crème Fraiche

    Ingredients:

    • 1 cup heavy cream
    • 1 tablespoon buttermilk
    • 2 tablespoons powdered sugar
    • 2 tablespoons cracked black pepper (coarse)
    • 1 pint strawberries

    Preparation:

    1. Begin making the crème fraîche about a day and a half before you plan to serve this dessert. Place whipping cream and buttermilk in a jar with a lid. Add 2 tablespoons powdered sugar, cover securely and shake for 15 seconds. Set aside in a warm room temperature spot (70-75 degrees F.) for approximately 24 hours, stirring once or twice, until mixture is very thick. The warmer the temperature of the room, the faster the cream will thicken. It should be the consistency of yogurt.
    2. Stir thickened crème fraîche well and refrigerate for at least 6 hours before serving. Covered tightly, crème fraîche will keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
    3. Wash and dry strawberries, leaving any green leaves or stems attached. Gently dip and twist the bottom half of each strawberry into the crème fraîche, then sprinkle lightly with fresh cracked black pepper before serving.

    Serving Suggestion:

    Add a teaspoon of vanilla extract to the crème fraîche, and spoon it onto fresh blueberries, sliced peaches, pies or brownies. Plain (unsweetened) crème fraîche can also be used with chopped fresh herbs or threads of saffron as a sauce for fish or poultry.

    Reprinted by permission from StrongerTogether.coop.  Find articles about your food and where it comes from, recipes, and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.

     


  • Eat Seasonally: Asparagus | 04.26.2013

    Forget about the robin, asparagus is the real first sign of spring!  This much-adored seasonal vegetable epitomizes the season: fresh, crisp and juicy, a beautiful shade of spring green. Its flavor is distinctive and quite sweet when fresh. Although asparagus is easily enjoyed lightly steamed and barely dressed with butter and a squeeze of lemon, it is irresistible when roasted or grilled and served with garlicky French aioli or a spicy sesame-soy dipping sauce. Eggs and asparagus are natural friends: try chopped asparagus and mushrooms in a quiche with goat cheese, or a quick and easy egg scramble with asparagus, tomatoes, and brie.

    AsparagusAsparagus Antipasto Platter
    Serves 10.
    Prep time: 30 minutes active, 75 minutes total.

    Ingredients

    Antipasto:
    1 pound (1 bunch) fresh asparagus, woody ends trimmed
    1 cup canned artichoke hearts, drained and halved or quartered
    ¼ pound prosciutto, thinly sliced
    ¼ pound salami, sliced into bite-sized rounds or pieces
    1 cup Kalamata olives (or other olives of choice)
    1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
    1/3 pound sliced Provolone cheese

     Dressing:
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
    ½ teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed or minced
    ¼ teaspoon Italian seasoning
    ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
    2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
    3 tablespoons olive oil
    1 lemon, zest and juice
    1 orange
    Pinch each of salt and ground black pepper

    Preparation
    Blanch the asparagus in boiling, salted water for 3-4 minutes, then rinse with cold water or cool in an ice bath. Drain well. Zest the orange, and juice half for the dressing.  In a small bowl, whisk all of the dressing ingredients together. Toss the blanched asparagus and artichokes in 2 tablespoons of the dressing and marinate for 60 minutes.  Once asparagus and artichokes have finished marinating, arrange the antipasto on a large platter, and drizzle with the remaining dressing. Serve with fresh crusty bread or baguette slices. 

    Reprinted by permission from StrongerTogether.coop.  Find articles about your food and where it comes from, recipes, and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.

     


  • Making Your Own Stock | 01.02.2013

    Soup stock is the foundation for many of the tastiest soups, and it’s a flavor enhancer for many a dish too.  But canned and packaged stocks are generally high in sodium and may include artificial ingredients, like monosodium glutamate (MSG). You can find healthier and organic varieties at your co-op, but if you use stock frequently in your cooking, it can get expensive. Despite what you may think, making your own stock requires minimal effort, costs little money, and will keep you, well, stocked for months.

    There are a million and one uses for a good homemade stock, including:

    • Making your own soups and stews
    • Adding depth to homemade pasta sauces
    • Using in place of water or butter to infuse rice, couscous, or other grains with flavor
    • Braising greens and other vegetables
    • Deglazing pans to make gravy
    • Substituting for wine in any recipe

    The most versatile stocks are chicken and vegetable stock, but the possibilities don’t stop there.  Beef stock, fish stock, chili stock, ginger stock—the list is limited only by your imagination. For the sake of simplicity, file away this basic how-to for chicken or vegetable stock and improvise from there.

    What you’ll need:

    • 1 pound chicken bones (if making chicken stock); reserve the bones every time you roast a local, pastured chicken and freeze in a plastic bag until you’re ready to make stock
    • 1 pound assorted vegetables: carrots, celery, onions, garlic, or other root vegetables, washed and chopped into large pieces
    • 1-2 dried bay leaves
    • A few handfuls of fresh herbs: thyme, rosemary, sage, parsley, or whatever else you have on hand, washed and added to the pot, stems and all
    • 2-3 tablespoons whole spices: black peppercorns, coriander, caraway, fennel, etc.

    In a large soup or stockpot, add all the ingredients and cover with 12-16 cups of water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and let simmer for 3-4 hours. The liquid should reduce slowly; if it seems to be drying out quickly, add more water and turn down the heat.

    After 3-4 hours, strain the stock, discarding all solids (it’s okay if a few whole spices escape the strainer). You should be left with 8-10 cups of stock. Season to taste with salt or just wait to salt until you use it in a recipe. Divide stock into one-cup portions in small plastic bags or containers and freeze (this way, you can thaw just as much as you need).

    Just one Sunday afternoon spent making a batch of stock can save you $20-25 on the store-bought variety over the course of a few months.  And you’ll have a healthier, more flavorful ingredient to use in your kitchen—no bones about it.

    Reposted by permission from StrongerTogether.coop. Find articles about your food and where it comes from, recipes and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.


  • Drinks to Warm Up Your Holidays | 12.04.2012

    Hand off a hot beverage — to dinner guests, neighbors who drop by or kids during story time — and you instantly warm both tummies and hearts. Make sure you treat yourself too; wrapping your hands around a warm mug in the midst of a cold day can help you unwind!

    Traditional favorites include hot cider, cocoa, teas and coffees — all so good there’s no need to look for replacements. But by adding just a few of the right spices, you can transform these everyday winter drinks into extraordinary festive fare.

    Tips for Spicing Up a Variety of Hot Drinks

    * Mull to be merry. Mulling a beverage simply means heating and spicing it. Sometimes sweeteners and/or other beverages are added, too. Mulled apple juice or cider is classic, but why not mull other favorites, like cherry, raspberry, white grape and cranberry juices, as well as red and white wines? Just be careful not to boil the wine or you’ll ruin the taste and evaporate the alcohol. Good mulling spices include allspice, cinnamon, cloves, fenugreek, ginger, lemon peel, nutmeg, orange peel and star anise. Have fun experimenting — or streamline your routine by stocking up on a mulling spice mix.

    * Give the crock a workout. Fill your crock pot with an aromatic and warm spiced beverage and keep it on low throughout the day. You’ll have a ready-to-serve treat at any time, and your home will be scented, too.

    * Make an impression with homemade gifts. For simple but lovely homemade gifting, combine the dry ingredients for a special hot drink in a small jar or canister and tie with a festive ribbon. Punch a hole in a recipe card with mixing directions and attach to the ribbon. For even easier gifting, simply place a package of beverage mix — like those mulling spices — in a festive mug and tie with a ribbon. Or choose a special tea and deliver it in a pretty cup and saucer.

    * Stock up on cinnamon sticks. Indispensable for mulling, cinnamon sticks also spruce up hot party drinks when used as swizzlers.

    * Spruce up your black teas. Add cinnamon sticks, orange peel and/or lemon peel to any black tea. Sweeten, if you like, with honey or brown sugar. To richen the flavor even further, add a tablespoon or two of cognac.

    * Enliven green teas with crystallized ginger and sliced fruit (like pears).

    * Think ethnic. For Spanish flair, add black pepper and chilies or cinnamon to hot chocolate. For French influence, thicken cocoas with cornstarch or arrowroot and stir in some Grand Marnier and vanilla extract. Top with a pinch of freshly ground nutmeg.

    * For a mocha drink, simply use strongly brewed coffee in place of some of the liquid in your favorite hot cocoa recipe.

    * Add quality flavorings or extracts for an instant flavor boost. Frontier Natural Products offers every option from almond to walnut for any hot beverage — including milk, cocoa, tea and coffee.

     

    Here’s the recipe for deliciously rich toddy that adds delight to any gathering:

    Visions of Sugarplums Toddy

    Ingredients:
    4 cups milk, divided in half (dairy, rice, or soy)
    2 Tbsp. honey
    1/8 tsp. cardamom powder
    4 oz. white baking chocolate, chopped
    1 tsp. vanilla extract
    1/4 tsp. nutmeg powder
    4 6-inch cinnamon sticks

    Directions:
    Warm 2 cups of the milk, honey, cardamom, and baking chocolate in a saucepan until chocolate is melted. Add remaining milk and heat until warm. Stir in vanilla. Pour into cups, sprinkle with nutmeg and add cinnamon stick stirrers. Substitute almond extract (or another flavoring, like peppermint extract) for the vanilla now and then. At a toddler’s tuck-in time, serve without the chocolate to induce slumber. Makes about 4 servings.

    Reprinted with permission from Frontier Natural Foods Co-op.


  • Eat Seasonally: Pear Galette | 10.31.2012

    Pears, like apples and raspberries, are members of the same plant family as the fragrant rose.  With over 3,000 varieties, pears appear in many shades of red, purple, yellow, green, and brown.  Peak pear season ranges from late summer to early winter, when common varieties like Bosc, Bartlett, and Red Bartlett are readily available.  Look for juicy, exquisite French varieties like D’Anjou seasonally. When ripe, pears change from a green to yellow hue visible through their primary color.  Pears are a good source of fiber and vitamin C.  Add chopped pears to a quinoa and spinach salad or try an open-faced sandwich with arugula, Camembert and grilled pears on a baguette.

     

    Pear GalettePear Galette
    Posted with permission from www.strongertogether.coop

    Serving Size:  6 servings
    Total Time:  1 hour, 25 minutes; 30 minutes active

    Ingredients:

    Dough:

    • 1 cup all-purpose flour
    • 1 tablespoon sugar
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 2 large eggs (1 for dough, 1 for egg wash)
    • 1 teaspoon milk
    • 5 tablespoons  butter, cold and cut into small pieces

    Filling:

    • 2 tablespoons apricot jam
    • 2 largeAnjoupears
    • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
    • 2 teaspoons sugar
    • Pinch of ground nutmeg

    Preparation

    1. To make the dough, whisk together flour, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter or fingers until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. In a small bowl, whisk together one egg and milk. Add half of the egg and milk mixture to the dough and mix to incorporate. Mix in the remaining egg and milk, and make the dough into a flat disk. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. After refrigeration, roll out the dough into a 9 to 10-inch circle and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Brush the top surface of the dough with the apricot jam, and return it to the refrigerator until the pears are ready.
    2. Preheat oven to 425°F. While the oven is heating, quarter and core the pears, then slice them lengthwise into quarter-inch slices. Place the pear slices in a fan shape on the chilled circle of dough, leaving a 1 1/2-inch border. Drizzle melted butter over the pears and then sprinkle with sugar and nutmeg. Gently fold the edge of the dough up and over the pears to form a rim. In a small bowl, beat the remaining egg and brush the rim and edges of the dough with the beaten egg. Place the galette in the oven and bake for about 25 minutes until the edges are browning. Let rest a few minutes before slicing.

     

    Serving Suggestion
    The beauty of this fruit tart is in its irregularly-shaped handmade crust. Serve warm with French vanilla ice cream or brandy sauce and whipped cream.


  • Butternut and Mushroom Steel-Cut Risotto | 09.25.2012

    Recipe submitted by Member/Owner Maia Dickerson, “The earthiness of the mushrooms combined with the sweetness of the roasted squash makes this a great fall dish. The steel-cut oats re-place traditional Arborio rice lending a little chewiness to the creamy texture, making this one of my favorite comfort foods.”

    Serving size: 3-5
    Prep time: 20 minutes
    Cooking time: 30-40 minutes
    Ready in: 60 minutes

    Ingredients:
    1 small to medium squash, peeled and diced
    1/2 T. oil
    11/2 tsp. sage
    1/8 tsp. salt
    1/8 tsp. pepper
    3/4 c. water
    14 oz. vegetable broth
    1 tsp. butter
    1/2 onion, diced
    2 cloves of garlic, minced
    2 c. sliced brown mushrooms
    1 c. steel cut oats
    1/2 c. white wine
    1/4 c. shaved parmesan

    Toss squash with oil, 1/2 tsp. sage, and salt and pepper. Roast squash at 400° for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from oven and let sit. In a small sauce pan, heat water and vegetable broth, simmer on low making sure not to boil.

    In a large skillet, melt butter and add onions and garlic, cook for 3 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook until the juices are released, 3-5 minutes. Stir in the oats, add wine, and cook for 1 minute. Next, add 1/2 of the broth mixture to the skillet. Stir frequently, cook until liquid is mostly absorbed.  Add broth mixture a 1/4 c. at a time, stir frequently, be sure all the liquid is absorbed between each addition.  Remove from heat, add squash, parmesan, 1 tsp. sage, and salt and pepper to taste.


  • How to Keep Your Fruits & Veggies Fresh | 07.30.2012

    I’ll admit I’m one to go a little crazy in the produce department and farmers’ markets.  Especially this time of year, I’m enticed by the colors and freshness of all the local produce and end up with a little extra in my Market bag.  I’ll find a way to work in that kohlrabi that just came in from Tom Kress or Danly Farms!

    Alicia with Co-op kid Carmen playing on the produce wagon

    And my fridge looks beautiful!  For a while.  My plans to cook delicious meals all week long fade (as do my veggies!) when more summer outings with friends present themselves – events in Downtown Billings, baseball games, concerts – summer fills up fast!

    So I was excited to stumble across this handy guide, “How-To: Store Fruits and Vegetables”, from the Ecology Center’s Berkeley Farmers’ Markets to keep my produce fresh a little bit longer, or at least until I can make time to cook them.  The guide lists how best to store 60 popular fruits and vegetables – without using plastic.

    A few tips from the guide:

    Apples (I’m anticipating the delicious varieties from Ross Orchards in Fromberg) – Store on a cool counter or shelf for up to two weeks.  For longer storage, they can be kept in a cardboard box in the fridge.

    Stonefruit (apricots, nectaries, peaches, plums) – Store on a cool counter at room temperature.  Only refrigerate when fully ripe!

    Berries – Keep them dry (wash only before eating) and don’t stack too many high when storing.  They’re very fragile.

    Greens – Most greens should be kept slightly damp (not wet or they’ll rot faster) in an airtight container.  The hardier greens, such as collards, chard, and kale, can be placed in a cup of water on the counter or fridge.  Yes, please – I’ll put an edible bouquet on my kitchen table.

    Tomatoes – Shouldn’t be refrigerated.  Keep them on the counter until ready to eat.

     

    Who you store the veggies with makes a difference in their longevity, too.  Check out this guide from the Vegetarian Times to find out which fruits and veggies should and shouldn’t be neighbors.

    Would you use plastic to store your fruits and veggies?  Is there another type of container you use for produce storage?  If you have any other tips, let me know!

    Alicia Reyer, GEM staff member, can be found either dancing or at the Market, usually with a cup of tea on her desk.


  • A Healthier “Pasta” Salad | 07.03.2012

    Trying to eat healthy over Fourth of July celebrations?  Keep it simple!  It can be as easy as looking at your favorite picnic foods and making a few simple changes.

    Take the iconic pasta salad.  Through processing, white wheat pasta loses some of the nutritional qualities!  Substituting the pasta in your favorite pasta salad recipe with a grain in its whole form will provide a broader range of nutrition.

    Cooking methods are similar to your pasta salads!  Cook the grain and cool (see below for details).  Add your favorite local, seasonal vegetables and a little cheese (feta works well), then add dressing, a little garlic powder, salt and pepper.  Get creative!  If you’re making your own dressing, combining the vinegar and herbs with the salad first, and then adding the olive or flax oil at the end, will enhance the flavor absorption.

    Here are a few grains to try:

    Quinoa
    An ancient, gluten-free grain cultivated in South America, quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is considered a complete protein, containing all the essential amino acids in a nearly perfect balance, and has a nutty flavor.  It is easily digested and provides a good source of iron, magnesium, calcium, vitamin A and vitamin E.
    To cook, use 2 cups of water per cup of quinoa.  Combine quinoa and water in a pot, bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium, cover, and cook for 15 minutes.

    Short Grain Brown Rice
    A popular grain used in much ethnic cooking, rice is a good source of fiber, vitamin E and trace minerals.  Using a cooking method similar to pasta will decrease the soft, sticky qualities, making it more suitable to a salad.
    To cook, bowl 5 cups of water.  Lower heat and add brown rice.  Cover and simmer for 50 minutes or until tender.

    Farro
    An unhybridized and ancient type of wheat cultivated in Europe and North Africa and said to be the grain that fueled the Roman legions.  Today it is cultivated especially in Tuscany and other areas of Italy.  It has a chewy texture and depth of flavor, is similar in looks to a short-grain brown rice and is rich in fiber, magnesium, vitamin A & E, and B vitamins.
    To cook, combine 3 cups of water per cup of farro and combine in a pot.  Bring to boil, then lower heat, cover, and simmer until tender, about 2-3 hours.  To speed up cooking process, soak farro in water for 6 to 12 hours, then simmer for 50 to 60 minutes.  For pearled farro, soaking is not necessary.  Simmer for 30 minutes or less, using 2 cups of water per cup of farro.

     

    Pesto Farro Salad 

    Serves 4

    Ingredients:
    • 1.5 cups farro (Timeless Seeds, Inc., Conrad, MT)
    • 3 cups water
    • 1 tsp salt
    • 2-3 cups fresh basil leaves (Yellowstone Valley Farms, Laurel, MT)
    • 1-2 cloves garlic
    • ¼ cup pine nuts or walnuts
    • ¼ cup parmesan cheese, grated
    • ¼ cup olive oil
    • ½ tsp. salt
    • 1.5 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
    • 1.5 cups grape tomatoes, halved (Negaard Greenhouse, Grass Range, MT)

    Method:
    1. Cook rice in salted water until done. Cool.
    2. Prepare pesto. Chop garlic and nuts in food processor until fine.  Add basil and process while slowly adding olive oil. Blend in parmesan cheese.
    3. Combine rice, pesto, tomatoes, and balsamic vinegar. Salt and pepper to taste.
    Add more olive oil if necessary.


  • Einkorn “Blender” Pancakes | 06.20.2012

    Einkorn wheat has been around for a very long time—this tough-husked wheat was cultivated in its earliest form around 10,000 years ago near the Fertile Crescent.  Einkorn is considered to be the oldest known domesticated wheat and thrives in conditions that other wheat does not.  Its durability, however, has not prevented it from becoming scarcely cultivated for close to 2,000 years.

    So why is Dr. Oz talking about Einkorn wheat now, in 2012?  Why am I learning about Einkorn in my webinars some 10,000 years later?  As it turns out, the Mesopotamians were on to something, whether they understood gluten toxicity or not. 

    The gluten protein in Einkorn isn’t as harmful as gluten in other wheat to those suffering from celiac disease, and the reason may lie in the fact that the gliadin in Einkorn is chromosomally different from the gluten in modern wheat.  Researchers suggest that this very basic difference in gluten structure may even have a profound positive impact on the way those with celiac disease feel.  Of course, if you have gluten intolerance or celiacs, make sure you check with your doctor before eating Einkorn, as it still has gluten.  Watch this video from the Dr. Oz Show talking about how much he loves Einkorn (at 2:30 minutes). 

    Since this grain is not only a new product to me, but new to GEM as well, I figured I better taste it!  My options were either Jovial Foods organic pasta, or Einkorn whole grains in bulk.  I chose to make Einkorn pancakes from the whole grain.  Pancakes are delicious, and they can be healthy, too.  I found a multitude of recipe options online for everything Einkorn, so if pancakes don’t work for you, jump online or call me at the Market for some other ideas.  

     

    Healthy Whole Grain Einkorn “Blender” Pancakes

    Ingredients

    • 2 C. whole Einkorn grain kernels (from the bulk department)
    • 2 1/2 C. water
    • 1/2 C. powdered milk (from the bulk department)
    • 2 eggs (local, free range)
    • 4 T. expeller pressed coconut oil (Spectrum)
    • 2 T. raw, unfiltered honey (Drange Apiary,Laurel,MT)
    • 1 t. sea salt (Real Salt from the bulk department)
    • 2 T. aluminum-free baking powder

    Directions

    1.  In blender (I used a Magic Bullet, which I’d never used before, but it was the perfect size for this recipe and worked well), combine the Einkorn grain kernels, water, and powdered milk on high for 5 minutes for a smooth mix.  For those that like to the texture of a larger grain, blend for about 3 minutes.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2.  Add egg, oil, honey and salt. Blend for 20 seconds.  Depending on your blender, you may need to  blend for 45 seconds.

    3.  Add baking powder gradually, 1 tablespoon at a time. Pulse three times, just enough to mix. Mixture should foam up and get very light.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    4.  Cook immediately on a hot, nonstick griddle.  If you don’t have a non-stick, put a little oil in the pan to prevent sticking and add a nice moistness to the pancakes.

     

    This recipe makes about 10 pancakes and they turned out perfectly!  The consistency and density reminded me of cornmeal pancakes, with less sweetness.  The butter and maple syrup absorbed into the pancake, and I’m sure it’d be easy to add blueberries or any seasonal fruit into the mix before cooking! These cakes take no time at all to prepare and they’re healthy, being made with whole grains and sweetened with honey.

    I ate seven pancakes.  My wife ate three.

    by Dan Davis, GEM’s Bulk Buyer


  • Get your favorite recipe published! | 04.04.2012

    As you may have heard, GEM recently partnered with Dr. Sarah Keller’s Media for Social Change class at MSUB for a variety of exciting projects. One of those projects gave us a great start on an official GEM cookbook and it looking fantastic! We’re set to include lots of great information about seasonal availability and local producers.

    What we really need now, though, are your recipes. After seeing countless loads of groceries leave through the doors of GEM, we now want focus on what happens in the kitchen. Whether it’s a family favorite passed down through the generations, or an experiment gone right, we’d love to share it.

    Recipes can be submitted to gemcookbook@gmail.com.  If you’d like to submit a photo, they are best in .jpeg format. 

    Recipes will be considered for the cookbook and may be used in the future in the store and our website.  Recipes submitted will be entered in a drawing to win a $50 gift certificate and one of 10 cookbooks.  Deadline May 1.

    *Recipes, unless merely a list of ingredients, reprinted word-for-word are subject to copyright infringement. Adaptations, however, are acceptable for reprint. Please personalize your recipe.


  • Curry Lime Chicken? Yes, please. | 03.27.2012

    Mark's making Curry Lime Chicken Salad!

     

    Years ago, we began cooking this healthy recipe which quickly became an obsession among members.  Curry Lime Chicken Salad, with its sweet and spicy deliciousness, is not your average chicken salad and has been the subject of numerous recipe requests!

    Is Curry Lime Chicken Salad your favorite Deli Café salad?  Or do you have another obsession?

     

     

     

     

     

    Curry Lime Chicken Salad

    Serving size: 8-10
    Prep time: 1 hour
    Cooking time: 30 minutes
    Ready in: 1 hour 30 minutes

    Ingredients:
    5 lb. boneless chicken breast, cooked and cut into ½-inch cubes
    ⅜ c. olive oil
    ⅓ c. curry powder, a mix of hot and mild
    1 c. red onion, finely diced
    1 c. carrots, sliced in squares
    2 c. red pepper, diced
    3 c. frozen mangoes, chopped into small pieces
    ⅜ c. currants
    1 c. cashews, toasted
    1⅓ c. shredded coconut, toasted

    Dressing Ingredients:
    ⅜ c. lime juice
    2 c. mayonnaise
    3/8 c. Patak’s mango-lime chutney

    Heat olive oil.  When hot, add curry powder and combine until just fragrant.  Remove
    from heat and add to cubed, cooked chicken. With gloved hands,
    mix until each piece of chicken is coated with yellow curry mixture.  Add
    all vegetables, nuts, coconut, and mangoes to chicken mixture. Mix dressing
    with a whisk and add to chicken.  Mix until combined.  Add sea salt to
    taste.

    In the Deli Café:
    Curry Lime Chicken Salad – $11.99/lb.