Category: Eat Seasonally

  • Talking Turkey: A Poultry Primer | 11.14.2016

    First time cooking a turkey? Or just want a refresher before the big day? You’ve found your primer.
    (more…)


  • Local Producer Spotlight: White Deer Ranch | 01.01.2016

    White Deer Ranch

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    Lee and Roxanne, the owners, during a farm tour 2015. Photo credit Casey Paige, Billings Gazette.

    PHILOSOPHY
    Lee and Roxanne , the Owners of White Deer Ranch, believe that if they take care of the earthworms and the honeybees with proper earth stewardship, everything else will thrive. They grow micro-greens in their historic ranch building converted to a greenhouse. Pick up these highly nutritious and tasty plants at the Good Earth Market in the produce section in 2.5 oz clamshells. Micros can be used in salads, smoothies, topping your favorite dish savory dish. A fantastic ingredient in pesto, dips, stews and more! Its fresh and its local!!

    MICROGREENS
    What is is? A microgreen is a tiny vegetable green that is used both as a visual and flavor component or ingredient primarily in fine dining restaurants. Fine dining chefs use microgreens to enhance the beauty, taste and freshness of their dishes with their delicate textures and distinctive flavors. Smaller than “baby greens” and harvested later than “sprouts” microgreens can provide a variety of leaf flavors, such as sweet and spicy. They are also known for their various colors and textures. Among upscale markets, they are now considered a specialty genre of greens that are good for garnishing salads, soups, plates, and sandwiches.

    Edible young greens and grains are produced from various kinds of vegetables, herbs or other plants. They range in size from 1” to 3” including the stem and leaves. A microgreen has a single central stem which has been cut just above the soil line during harvesting. It has fully developed cotyledon leaves and usually has one pair of very small, partially developed true leaves. The average crop-time for most microgreens is 10–14 days from seeding to harvest.

    TOURS AND ON-FARM STORE
    Lee and Roxanne invite you to come visit them at their ranch/farm, which is organic certified for hay, pasture and foraged plants, to learn more about the animal systems that integrate with farming and ranching systems to renovate and regenerate the land. You can buy free range eggs, microgreens, dried herbs, mushrooms, Roxanne’s natural creams and potions and MORE at the Farm Stand located on the porch of the Yellow House where they live.

    Schedule a tour for individuals or for groups. The tours are very affordable and might include all or any of these topics, a demonstration or a classroom setting and can be set up to suit different age groups and interest levels. Fun sights to see anytime of year are the microgreen production in the greenhouse, beehouse, pastured pigs, mobile chicken coop, dwarf goats, Jersey/Angus cross cattle and the farm store.  They often include some refreshments or tastings of their homegrown goodies.

    FARM STAYS
    This is agricultural tourism in motion! See how we experience a back-to-the-land approach to vacationing, which is authentic, relaxing and educational. Two different rental houses to choose from that fit many family sizes or couples.

    Contact them and learn more through Facebook or their website.

    TURKISH DIP

    Known in Turkey as cacik, this garlicky mixture of green vegetables, fresh herbs and yogurt can be served as a salad or as a dip with pita and raw vegetables.  Traditionally, cacik is made with a number of vegetables, including cucumbers, cabbage and beets.

    2.5 oz. clamshell of sunflower microgreens
    1 garlic clove, minced
    1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or 1 teaspoon dried
    3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley or 1 teaspoon dried
    1 tablespoon fresh chopped mint or 1 teaspoon dried
    2-3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
    1 cup thick greek style yogurt
    1/4 cup chopped fresh scallions (optional)

    Preparation:
    Combine all ingredients in a food processor and use short bursts to chop the sunflower into small bits and to mix the ingredients together.  To prepare without a processor, chop all ingredients finely and mix together.  Refrigeration only makes the flavors combine better, so make a double batch and save it in a lidded jar in the refrigerator.

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    This is the inside of the beehouse. One of the many features of White Deer Ranch. Photo credit: Tracy Konoske, visitor.

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    China the Meishan Sow is a pastured pig living her life as nature intended loving being a pig. Photo credit: Roxanne Dunn.

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    The goats are really friendly and love petting. Photo credit: Alexis Brill, visitor.

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    Lee explains the benefits of the behooves to a tour participant in 2015. Photo credit: Tracy Konoske, visitor.

     

     


  • Local Producer Spotlight – Wholesome Foods Farm | 09.24.2015

    MargeuriteWholesome Foods Farm is a multi-generational collaboration between land-owners Dick and Patricia Espenscheid and farm manager and owner Marguerite Jodry.

    When Dick and Patricia began farming their land south of Bridger, it was always with the intent to someday pass on a sustainable farm and ranch to a young person willing to continue the business and the practices for years to come. At the end of 2014, they were able to realize this vision by passing on the business of Wholesome Foods Farm to their former Assistant Manager, Marguerite Jodry. Marguerite now leases the land, equipment, and buildings from them and continues to raise vegetables and free-range hogs for markets in the Billings and Red Lodge areas.

    When asked about the challenges and lessons she learned as a newly minted farmer, she says, “The biggest lesson I’ve learned is about the undeniable role of healthy soil in producing good food. Coming to think of myself as a farmer of soil, first, and of food, second, is an ongoing and transformational paradigm shift.”

    In discussing her role as a business owner and player in our local food movement, “The most valuable lesson I’ve learned so far is that my success is interconnected with that of other small growers, businesses, and individuals in our community. By understanding community demands and desires while working with other farmers to best fill that need, we are working together to create a more resilient local food system.”

    Wholesome Foods Farm provides a wide range of vegetables to the Good Earth Market. “We feel our products are appreciated by a growing number of people who see the value of supporting local food and farming businesses that prioritize sustainable practices,” Margeurite says. “Selling at the Good Earth Market not only allows us to reach this valuable customer base, but helps us be a part of a local food system that builds health and wealth in our community.”

    Wholesome Foods Farm sells direct at the Gardeners’ Market, Thursdays at South Park in Billings, the Red Lodge Farmers’ Market, Fridays at Lions Park in Red Lodge and the Yellowstone Valley Farmers Market, Saturdays in downtown Billings. You can also find their produce and hogs featured in Red Lodge restaurants such as Honey’s Cafe, Hope’s Artisan Bakery and Mas Taco to name a few.

    Follow Montana Wholesome Foods on their Facebook page!


  • New Summer Rosé | 05.17.2015

    Carpineto Dogajolo Rosato
    Dogajolo RosatoA dry, elegant rosé from internationally acclaimed Tuscan producer, Carpineto. The lastest edition to their entry-level line of wines, this rosé, made from a blend of 100% Sangiovese, has enticing floral aromas and bright fruit flavors.

    The name Dogajolo was invented by Carpineto’s founders, derived from the Italian word doga, meaning “stave” — the narrow strips of wood used to form oak casks. Carpineto Dogajolo Rosato shows vibrant floral aromas of rose and myrtle with hints of fruit, like apples, currants, and sour cherries. A refreshing wine with an invigorating acidity and a clean finish, enjoy as an aperitif or paired with antipasto platters consisting of cured meats and mild cheeses. Also excellent with grilled fish!
    Domaine de Fontsainte Gris de Gris
    pic - gris de grisThe Fontsainte vineyards surround the hamlet of Boutenac in the area known as “The Golden Crescent” in France, a swath of land whose sunny setting and cool sea breeze create a beautifully balance terroir. The first vineyards at Domaine de Fontsainte were planted by the Romans. Artifacts found in these vineyards, such as an old coin dating from the time of Marcus Agrippa in 25 A.D., are a testament to its antiquity.

    Yves Laboucarié’s family has been making wine here since the seventeenth century and believe that “great wines are made in the vineyard” and less in the cellars. They farm the land sustainably and keep treatments to a minimum. Many of their vines are older, especially the parcel known as La Demoiselle, which recently celebrated its hundredth year.

    Look for the highly affordable and supremely delicious Gris de Gris, a saignée rosé made from Grenache Gris—among the finest rosés on the planet. Expressive and particularly tonic, the wine immediately gives off notes of raspberry, cherry and freshly picked strawberries – followed by exotic aromas such as pineapple and mango. Stunningly balanced, this is an extremely appetent wine! Ideal as an aperitif with toast and crushed olives, or with wok-fried vegetables and garlic mayonnaise, grilled fish, lamb tagine, or finely roasted chicken with rosemary.

    Sean Minor Four Bears Vin Gris
    Pic - Sean MinorSean Minor Family of Wines has a passion for coaxing things out of the earth and bringing them to the dinner table. After beginning a career in finance, Sean Minor began working with Napa Valley’s Beaulieu Vineyard. Realizing he had a passion for winemaking, Sean took classes in viticulture and enology and learned the trade at several vineyards in Napa Valley and the Pacific Northwest. Sean Minor Family of Wines was founded in 2005 with a focus on creating great, affordable wines.

    Sean Minor’s Vin Gris is a pale salmon color with vibrant aromas of ripe strawberries and watermelon. On entry, the wine displays bright tangy flavors of raspberries, cherries and strawberries. Throughout the mid-palate and finish, raspberry and cherry fruit characters are balanced with spicy and crisp acidity that linger creating a refreshing and lengthy finish.

     

    A to Z Oregon Rosé

    14AZRS_webThe 2014 A to Z Oregon Rosé leads with aromas of strawberries, tangerine, watermelon and grenadine with hints of thyme and hibiscus then opens to reveal plum, apricot and more strawberry notes. Clean, balanced and approachable with generous fruit, the crisp and juicy A to Z Rosé integrates excellent texture with firm acidity finishing long and pretty.


  • Fall Foods for the Whole Family | 08.24.2014

    SquashFall is back-to-school time as well as harvest time for a variety of super nutritious fruits and vegetables. Why not send your kids back to the classroom full of the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants their bodies will need to stay healthy as cold season sets in?

    Squashes are among the cheapest and easiest fall fruits to prepare, and they pack a powerhouse of nutrients, including potassium, carotenoids, folate, and fiber. Best of all, they are both kid friendly and baby friendly, being a great food for infants.

    To prepare squash, simply split any variety (acorn, butternut, pumpkin, spaghetti) down the middle with a large knife, scoop out the seeds, place the halves flesh-side down in a pan with ½-inch of water, and bake at 350 degree for 45-60 minutes. The squash is done when a knife sinks easily into the flesh. To serve, scoop out the flesh and add butter and cinnamon to taste.

    A high-quality butter from pastured animals will add Vitamins A and K2 to your dish as well as a healthy dose of saturated fat. Wait a minute, did I use healthy and saturated fat in the same sentence? Yes! Research is chipping away at the myth that saturated fat is bad, when in fact both saturated fat and cholesterol are essential for growth and development. See westonaprice.org for a wealth of information on the benefits of fat and other nutrient-dense foods—or do a Google search for the recent spate of articles in the news!

    Spaghetti squash can be a fun food for kids since it looks like, well, spaghetti! After baking, scrape out the flesh with a fork and serve with butter, salt, and pepper, or with a little pasta sauce and Parmesan cheese.

    Fall is also harvest time for that universal symbol of education, the apple. Making homemade applesauce or apple butter can be a fun project for the whole family, and can spare your kids the high-fructose corn syrup and other sweeteners added to commercial products.

    To make your own applesauce, simply cut apples into 1-inch chunks (no need to remove the skin—it has lots of nutrition!), sprinkle with cinnamon, and steam for about 10 minutes, or until the apples are soft. Place steamed chunks into a food processor and puree with a few squeezes of lemon juice. You can also add a tablespoon or two of virgin coconut oil for extra flavor and nutrition.

    For apple butter, place 10-20 sliced apples in a slow cooker with an inch of water (again, no need to remove the skin). Sprinkle with a generous amount of allspice and cinnamon and cook on low for 8-10 hours, checking periodically to make sure there is enough water in the bottom of the cooker to prevent burning. Puree the apples with the remaining water using a stick blender (or transfer to a food processor), adding a tablespoon or two of vanilla extract as you blend. If it’s too thick, add small amounts of water until you achieve the right consistency.

    Enjoy!

    Cori Hart is the local chapter leader for the Weston A. Price Foundation, committed to reintroducing nutrient-dense foods into the Standard American Diet. She can be reached at eatwell.livwell@gmail.com.


  • From the Local Producer Committee | 03.10.2014

    Soups 2

    GEM’s soups tell the story of why the Good Earth Market’s Local Producer Committee exists.   I just enjoyed a delicious cup of Greek Minestrone soup made of Seder Ridge turkey and Negaard Farm onions – a tasty, locally-sourced lunch on Valentines Day.  That’s something that sets GEM apart from any other grocery store in Billings, and most every restaurant, too.

    The GEM Local Producer Committee was launched in 2009 to expand the number of local producers who sell their food and products in the Market, and increase the amount of locally produced food and goods sold at GEM.   The Committee was instrumental in creating the Local Producer Map, available at the Market and in outlets around Billings.  The special features of GEM’s local producers displayed throughout the market is an outcome our work.   GEM’s Spring and Fall Local Producer Fairs are promoted and assisted by this committee.  Last year’s Early Season Farmers Market was our first foray into providing direct marketing options for local producers.

    The Local Producer Committee is gearing up for a repeat of the Early Season Farmers Market.     We’re recruiting producers to set up booths in the GEM lot and sell their food and wares from 9 am – noon every Saturday in June.   The Early Season Farmers Market was begun as a way to boost public understanding of the benefits of locally produced food and goods, and introduce shoppers to the farmers who grow their food.  It is timed before the Yellowstone Valley Farmers Market begins in July.  Get fresh greens, bedding plants and “early season” vegetables and other locally-produced items while enjoying a Saturday morning GEM coffee (or, my personal favorite, George of the Jungle smoothie).

    You can help us make the Early Season Farmers Market bigger and better.  Come down to shop and support the local producers, and bring along a friend.  Contact one of the Local Producer Committee members below if you’d like to help with advertising, set up and support.

    Serving on the Local Producer Committee are Heather Bilden, our capable committee past chairperson, new Board member Maggie Zaback, Maregurite Jodry  of Wholesome Foods, Kenny Reimche of Kenny’s Double D Salsa, Andi Buckley, former GEM, Alexis Bonogofsky, who with her partner Mike Scott farm off of Tired Man Road on the Yellowstone River, and GEM President Carol Beam.  Since the Local Producer Committee was first launched in 2009, we’ve been ably assisted by Marketing Manager Alicia Weber who is leaving.  Thank you, Alicia, for your commitment and excellent efforts!

    Early Season Farmer’s Market
    9am – 12pm
    Saturdays in June
    Good Earth Market parking lot

    By Theresa Keaveny, Board Secretary & Local Producer Committee Chairperson


  • Eat Seasonally: Sprouts | 12.25.2013

    sprouts Sprouts are that rare superfood that hits the sweet spot between flavor and nutrition. In addition to classic alfalfa sprouts, look for zesty radish, peppery broccoli or savory onion sprouts, as well as crisp and crunchy mung bean sprouts.

    At Good Earth Market, local producer The Growing Business, owned by Daphne Zortman, provides us these delicious greens. Daphne started growing sprouts with her sister back in 1984, and she’s still the type of person who likes to get in there and get her hands dirty. She enjoys eating her own sprouts and is convinced of their powerful health benefits. “They’re a powerhouse of nutrients,” she exclaims, adding that her sprouts are very natural, too, being grown in well water and then cleaned – there’s very little processing that goes on.

    It’s hard to improve on the classic sandwich combo of turkey, avocado and sprouts, but how about radish sprouts, fresh goat cheese, and tomato on multigrain bread? Or onion sprouts, cream cheese and cucumber on rye? Sprouts go beyond sandwiches, too – use mild-flavored mung bean sprouts to garnish everything from stir-fries to soups.

     

    Quick Vegetable Bibimbap
    This recipe is a delicious signature Korean dish, literally meaning “mixed rice”.
    Serves 6, ready in 1 hour

    Dish

    • 1 cup uncooked medium-grain brown rice
    • 1 tsp sesame oil
    • 1 tsp vegetable oil
    • 1 c. carrots, cut into matchsticks
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1 c. zucchini, cut into matchsticks
    • ¼ lb button mushrooms, thickly sliced
    • 6 oz fresh spinach
    • 4 green onions, sliced
    • ½ lb baked or fried tofu, cut into 1-2 inch squares
    • 1 c. cucumber, cut into matchsticks
    • 2 oz mung bean sprouts
    • Pinch of salt
    • Pinch of ground black pepper
    • 6 large eggs

    Sauce

    • ¼ c. hot sauce (Gochujang, Sriracha or other hot chili paste)2 tsp tamari
    • 1 T. water
    • 1 tsp. sugar
    • 1 tsp. rice vinegar
    • ½ tsp sesame seeds

    Start cooking the rice according to package directions. In a small bowl, mix together all sauce ingredients. Set aside.
    In a wok or large skillet, heat the sesame and vegetable oil over medium-high heat. Add carrots and stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add garlic, zucchini, and mushrooms and stir-fry for another 2-3 minutes. Add spinach, and stir-fry just until it’s wilted and tender (about a minute). Remove from heat and toss the vegetables with the tofu, cucumber, bean sprouts, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Set aside vegetables, and fry 6 eggs over easy.
    To serve, place a scoop of rice in each bowl, top with some stir-fried vegetables, place a cooked egg on top, and garnish with sliced green onions. Serve the sauce on the side for drizzling.

    Reprinted by permission from StrongerTogether.coop.  Find articles about your food and where it comes from, recipes, and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.


  • Eat Seasonally: Sweet Potatoes | 11.20.2013

    1113_table_tents_final_2

    One of nature’s simple pleasures, the humble sweet potato brings healthy, wholesome sweetness to home-cooked meals.  Sweet potatoes are nutty, smooth and full of beta carotene, vitamin C and fiber.  Bake small sweet potatoes whole (like baking potatoes) and top with scallions, sour cream, crumbled bacon or sautéed mushrooms for a flavorful alternative to an old favorite;  or try something new and add steamed, cubed sweet potato to a coconut milk-peanut curry over rice.  For updated comfort food, try a Cuban-style pork stew with seared poblano chilies and chunks of rich sweet potato in place of, or in addition to, regular potato.

    Go to www.strongertogether.coop for more tips and hints on using seasonal veggies.

    Yam What I Am
    Try this twist on a holiday staple.  Spicy and tangy, this salad is ready-to-eat  in our Deli Café!

    Serves 6
    Ready in 1 hour

    • 3 lbs. garnet yams, peeled and cut into ½” to ¾” cubes
    • 8 garlic cloves
    • 1/3 c. olive oil
    • 1 pinch dry chipotle pepper (or more to taste)
    • 1/3 c. brown rice vinegar
    • 1 c. pecans
    • 3/4 c. dried cranberries
    • 1 bunch green onions, diced

    Preheat oven to 350 F.  Combine cubed yams, garlic and olive oil in a roasting pan and bake until yams are soft, but not mushy (about 40 minutes).  Drain and retain olive oil and garlic cloves.  Combine garlic, olive oil, and chipotle peppers in food processor or blender and blend until well-mixed.  Add garlic mixture and all other ingredients to yams and mix well.

    We still have lots of local squash and pumpkins rolling in of all sizes, shapes and colors!


  • Eat Seasonally: Apples | 09.18.2013

    Beautiful, delicious, and healthy, apples are a triple win!  With so many varieties of apples to try, it is no use playing favorites.  Try a perfect Honeycrisp apple – its glacier-crisp crunch and perfect sweet-tart balance may challenge your ideas about health food.  Pie enthusiasts will want to try tart regional varieties like Granny Smith apples, adding lots of flavor without overdoing the sweetness.  Try toasting chopped apples with root vegetables when the weather gets cold, or use a cheese grater to shred fresh apple onto a green, leafy salad with curried raisin vinaigrette, and enjoy the sweet and savory flavors of a changing season.

    Watch for unique local varieties from Ross Orchards.  See our Produce page for a list!

    Ross Apples

    Brown Bag Apple Salad

    Serves 4-6.
    Prep time:  15 minutes

    Ingredients:
    1 apple, cored and cut into 1/2 inch pieces
    1 cup fresh pineapple, cut into 1-2/inch pieces
    1 cup seedless grapes, halved
    1 small orange, peeled and segmented
    1 tablespoon honey
    2 tablespoons apple juice
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1/2 cup granola
    Pinch of cinnamon
    3 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt (optional)

    Instructions:
    In a large bowl, mix together all of the ingredients and serve immediately.  If making the salad a day ahead, add granola just before serving.

    Serving suggestion:  Pack the apple salad into individual serving containers and top each with equal amounts of the granola (if the lunch box/bag will not be in the refrigerator, leave out the yogurt).  Substitute orange juice for apple juice or lime juice for the lemon juice for an even perkier flavor.

    Reposted by permission from StrongerTogether.coop, where you’ll find articles about you food and where it comes from, recipes and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.

     


  • Drink Like a Roman | 08.20.2013

    romanThe tangible evidence of antiquity’s amphitheaters and coliseums dot the European landscape, but the influence of the great Roman society is felt all around us. It was a multifaceted culture covering much of the globe, fostering a great value in education and community. Their endurance and influence staged the foundation for much of the world’s language, politics, philosophy and art.

    This progressive lifestyle spread throughout the modern world via conquest and imposed example; winemaking was no exception. Romans believed that wine was a necessity of daily life, occupying religious, medicinal and social roles. As their empire grew, it became more important to understand the vine. They sought out to produce better quality grapes, vigorously planting new vines to compete with the growing population and demand for export. Wine grapes were planted throughout the empire, simultaneously establishing the fundamentals of wine making.

    Their blossoming society was centered around Rome and, like their majestic ruins, many of the wines have stood the test of time. Just south of the town of Rome lies the Frascati region of Italy. Geological evidence traces their cultivation of grape vines back to the 5th century BC. Frascati is and has been planted with grapes indigenous to the Mediterranean basin and is best known for producing crisp and refreshing white wine meant to be consumed through the afternoon heat. Or perhaps August in Montana.

    Find it at the Co-op :Pic - Frascati

    MEMBER PRICE $9.99
    August 1 – September 31
    Reg. price $11.99

    2011 Villafranca Frascati Superiore
    Produced by the Gasperini family in the prestigious area of D.O.C.*, Frascati has upheld the most modern technologies, with a great respect to tradition, since 1909.

    Made from 65% Malvasia, 15% Trebbiano, and 15% Grechetto (Greco). Intense yellow color with greenish reflections. Characteristic persistent fresh and fruity aromas of melon and almond notes. Excellent as an aperitif and paired with fresh fish, seafood or white meat.

     

    *D.O.C. (Denominazione di origine controllata) – a system regulating the details of wine production put in place by the Italian government. Similar systems can be found throughout the world.

    Written by Lena Olson of Winegardner’s Wines. Learn more at www.winegardnerswines.com.

     

     


  • Summer YUM! | 07.30.2013

    We asked staff and member/owners which produce they’re most looking forward to this summer.  Here are their responses:

     

    The Battle kidsLindsey Battle, with Kimmie & Max IV
    Member/Owners

    “Our family likes to make sweet potato chips. And these little guys love bananas & apples. We also make kale chips and carrot fries in coconut oil. The carrots I fry, the rest I bake.”

     

    Carol Beam

    Carol Beam
    GEM’s Board President

    “My favorite fruit is actually what most people think is a vegetable – the ripe, red tomato. You need to slice it, add a dash of red wine vinegar, a dash of olive oil, a little salt & pepper, and a little basil. Let it sit and, oh my, you have the essence.”

     

    Heather BildenHeather Bilden
    Local Producer Committee Chair

    “Basil. I’m obsessed with the stuff. I like to add it plain to salads, like a green salad or a couscous salad, or even with steamed broccoli. It has so much flavor, it brings everything to life. Or I make pesto. It freezes really well in ice cube trays. Pop them into a freezer bag and they’re handy all winter.”

     

    PamPam Kemmick
    Deli Manager

    “One of our favorite things to do is wash and pluck grapes off the stem and put them in the freezer. Like little mini grape popsicle bites! We eat these all the time in the summer. They’re so delicious!”

     

    MacMac Schaffer
    Member/Owner

    APPLES! The local apples are brilliant here. There’a tree in my backyard just loaded and the funky ones are starting to fall now. You have to watch for bugs if you’re wildcrafting, but that’s still a lot of fun. I prefer local apples, but am eating Galas from New Zealand now. I really like the old-fashioned varieties, too. They used to grow so much here! Our area is great for fruit. I eat ‘em raw. I also like the local berries (lots of antioxidants!) and local Flathead cherries (good for the intestines!).”

     

    Joni SeeleyJoni Seeley
    Member-Owner

    “Apples are always good. I’m looking forward to them. Everybody likes the tomatoes and the watermelons. I like all of the local because it’s picked ripe and has more flavor. I love supporting local and appreciate the early farmer’s market you had this year. With the tomatoes, I just slice them and drizzle a little olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Or put them on a baguette with some feta or mozzarella, and a little basil. I like them cooked, too.”

     

    BenBen Anderson
    Lead Grocery Clerk

    “I’ve been into avocadoes, like guacamole, or cut up with tomatoes as a side dish. It’s cool and refreshing in the summer, and good with a little salt & pepper. It seems like they taste fresher in the summer because they’re in season.”

     

    Perry at his deskPerry McNeese
    General Manager

    “I LOVE BBar Ranch burgers, and the way I fix them is very unique. I put what I like on them, in them. I dice onions, quarter small, fresh mushrooms (don’t chop them any smaller or you won’t taste them), a few chopped jalapenos, cubes of blue or cheddar cheese (you can grate it, but then you won’t get the tasty pockets or cheese). I cook them medium, never well and make them huge – ½ pound hamburger with all the fixings. All ingredients go in raw – my favorite summer food!”

     

    Nolan  with pluotsNolan Fry
    Deli Clerk

    “Those pluots have been so amazing. They’re like candy, but better for you, obviously. I had never had them before I started working here. They’re incredibly juicy – two a day makes you a happy person.”

     

     


  • Food for Skin: Summer Foods that Promote Healthy Skin | 07.11.2013

    Summer is well upon us with warmth and sunshine. Our skin takes a beating with the elements of dry hot wind, pool water, and too much sun. How can we continue to have beautiful glowing, hydrated skin all summer long?

    The season of summer has its own special foods, color, elements, and influence. The element of summer is fire and this element rules the heart and small intestine. The heart represents not only the actual heart organ, but the emotional state and memory. When our hearts are healthy, we are able to solve problems effortlessly and arrive at brilliant solutions. The emotion for the summer heart is joy, and the sound is laughter.

    The fire element is associated with the color red, so all foods that are red in color, including tomatoes, red peppers, beets, strawberries and cranberries benefit the heart and small intestine. Lycopine, an antioxidant, is very beneficial for the heart organ.

    Some foods that are calming include mushrooms, brown rice, oats, and jujube.  Herbs such as chamomile, catnip, skullcap, passion flower, and valerian are calming and very helpful when your mind is racing and you cannot go to sleep.

    The summer skin can have too much redness, such as having flushed faces, rosecea, eczema, and psoriasis. Where there is too much redness in the face, the foods that are bitter can combat chronic congestion in the nose, lungs or face, as well as yeast overgrowth, obesity and skin eruptions. Bitter foods are very good for anybody who suffers with congestion on the face. The bitter taste also increases intestinal muscle contraction, which helps with the peristalsis movement in the intestines. This means good movement in the digestive system, and good digestive movement removes toxins in the body and helps clear the skin.  Some bitter foods include rhubarb, kale, watercress and celery.

    WatermelonOther great foods for summertime are roasted red peppers, watermelon, or chilled tomato soups to bring back the fluids lost during perspiration. Of course, drink plenty of water and use sunscreen.

    Managing the hydration levels in the body and skin is very important for having beautiful skin. As mentioned above, eating foods that have a water content is the best way to get that extra water into our systems.

    Watermelon, our most famous summer food, is amazing and in my next workshop, we will explore just how amazing watermelon is and how it benefits our skin and body.

    During the summer months, nature is at its most expansive, abundant manifestation. The sun is at its highest, food is plentiful, and all plant life is full of vital life force. So eat healthy summer foods, be filled with summer Joy, laugh a lot, and infuse the energy of the color red.  All this will enhance the summer glow with your skin that the vital life force produces.

    Learn more about summer foods and protecting your skin at Susan’s next workshop, Saturday, July 13, 1:00pm-2:00pm. Susan Reddig, B.S., is a Licensed Esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings, and Holistic Healthy Eating Coach. Susan’s focus is on beautiful skin through safe product and healthy eating.

     


  • Eat Seasonally: Strawberries | 06.06.2013

    Sliced red strawberry fruitStrawberries are one of the most-anticipated fruits of the summer; they are sweet, fragrant, and juicy, with a flavor that is unmistakable.  These berries might be small but they are packed with vitamin C and five different antioxidant compounds, which means they are a natural choice for a healthy diet.  It’s easy to use such tasty fruit; simply wash, slice, and top with whipped cream or vanilla yogurt for a simple dessert, or make a divine topping for ice cream and pancakes by stewing fresh strawberries, your favorite sweetener, and diced rhubarb until tender and falling apart. Don’t forget drinks:  frozen strawberries compliment beverages from lemonade to champagne!

    Peppered Strawberries with Crème Fraiche

    Ingredients:

    • 1 cup heavy cream
    • 1 tablespoon buttermilk
    • 2 tablespoons powdered sugar
    • 2 tablespoons cracked black pepper (coarse)
    • 1 pint strawberries

    Preparation:

    1. Begin making the crème fraîche about a day and a half before you plan to serve this dessert. Place whipping cream and buttermilk in a jar with a lid. Add 2 tablespoons powdered sugar, cover securely and shake for 15 seconds. Set aside in a warm room temperature spot (70-75 degrees F.) for approximately 24 hours, stirring once or twice, until mixture is very thick. The warmer the temperature of the room, the faster the cream will thicken. It should be the consistency of yogurt.
    2. Stir thickened crème fraîche well and refrigerate for at least 6 hours before serving. Covered tightly, crème fraîche will keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
    3. Wash and dry strawberries, leaving any green leaves or stems attached. Gently dip and twist the bottom half of each strawberry into the crème fraîche, then sprinkle lightly with fresh cracked black pepper before serving.

    Serving Suggestion:

    Add a teaspoon of vanilla extract to the crème fraîche, and spoon it onto fresh blueberries, sliced peaches, pies or brownies. Plain (unsweetened) crème fraîche can also be used with chopped fresh herbs or threads of saffron as a sauce for fish or poultry.

    Reprinted by permission from StrongerTogether.coop.  Find articles about your food and where it comes from, recipes, and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.

     


  • Eat Seasonally: Asparagus | 04.26.2013

    Forget about the robin, asparagus is the real first sign of spring!  This much-adored seasonal vegetable epitomizes the season: fresh, crisp and juicy, a beautiful shade of spring green. Its flavor is distinctive and quite sweet when fresh. Although asparagus is easily enjoyed lightly steamed and barely dressed with butter and a squeeze of lemon, it is irresistible when roasted or grilled and served with garlicky French aioli or a spicy sesame-soy dipping sauce. Eggs and asparagus are natural friends: try chopped asparagus and mushrooms in a quiche with goat cheese, or a quick and easy egg scramble with asparagus, tomatoes, and brie.

    AsparagusAsparagus Antipasto Platter
    Serves 10.
    Prep time: 30 minutes active, 75 minutes total.

    Ingredients

    Antipasto:
    1 pound (1 bunch) fresh asparagus, woody ends trimmed
    1 cup canned artichoke hearts, drained and halved or quartered
    ¼ pound prosciutto, thinly sliced
    ¼ pound salami, sliced into bite-sized rounds or pieces
    1 cup Kalamata olives (or other olives of choice)
    1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
    1/3 pound sliced Provolone cheese

     Dressing:
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
    ½ teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed or minced
    ¼ teaspoon Italian seasoning
    ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
    2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
    3 tablespoons olive oil
    1 lemon, zest and juice
    1 orange
    Pinch each of salt and ground black pepper

    Preparation
    Blanch the asparagus in boiling, salted water for 3-4 minutes, then rinse with cold water or cool in an ice bath. Drain well. Zest the orange, and juice half for the dressing.  In a small bowl, whisk all of the dressing ingredients together. Toss the blanched asparagus and artichokes in 2 tablespoons of the dressing and marinate for 60 minutes.  Once asparagus and artichokes have finished marinating, arrange the antipasto on a large platter, and drizzle with the remaining dressing. Serve with fresh crusty bread or baguette slices. 

    Reprinted by permission from StrongerTogether.coop.  Find articles about your food and where it comes from, recipes, and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.

     


  • Food for Skin: Spring Foods for Clear Skin | 03.29.2013

    Tree - stock exchangeSpring Fever’s bite is just around the corner.  We are anxious to smell the fresh air, feel the warm breeze and enjoy the promise of new life and rejuvenation.  During the Winter season, the cocooning and self reflection can now give way to the creative and bursting energy of Spring.  This energy is reaching from the depths of the earth and pushes with an upward rising movement stretching to the Heavens.  The very thought of Spring with its many colors and clean fragrance will refresh, nourish, and stimulate.  The color of Green is the energetic life color of the trees, plants, leaves, and grasses.

    In Spring, the element of Wood is symbolized by the tree that has roots planted in the earth and branches reaching to the Heavens.  The trunk holds life between the two worlds.  The human organs that correlate with the Wood Element are the liver and gallbladder. The liver is the organ in charge of helping the body break down toxins and when it is functioning properly peace and harmony are felt and there is focused direction and self-responsibility. When it is stagnated, there is anger, depression, and frustration.

    The Spring skin is the acne skin. This skin is red, inflamed, and congested. There may be rashes, allergic reactions, and eczema flare ups.  This is a good time to do a liver detoxification and eat simple dishes with lots of green vegetables. Sour foods also stimulate the liver and gallbladder.  The sour taste has an absorbing astringent function, stopping abnormal discharges of fluid from the body, like excessive sebum on the face.  Examples of sour foods are vinegar and lemons. Anybody who has papules and congestion on the face should drink a hot cup of water with one-half a lemon first thing in the morning. The hot water and lemon stimulate the liver to release bile and break up fats.  Other examples of sour foods are limes , pickles ,sour apples, sour plums, leeks, blackberries, grapes, mangoes. olives, raspberries, tangerines, tomatoes, sourdough bread, adzuki beans. Vegetables include broccoli, parsley, lettuce, carrots, alfalfa, beets, zucchini, shitake mushrooms, artichokes, cucumbers, celery, endive, and watercress.  The liver can be nourished and assisted in healing by eating foods and herbs that enhance the wood element.  Drinking a tea with dandelion, beet greens, and lemon will go far and is so simple to do.

    This Spring is a great time to get some healthy nutrition through green smoothies. Smoothies are fun and easy to make in your blender or nutibullet type of mixer.  An awesome green smoothie is one made with green vegetables and green fruits along with a small amount of antioxidant berries.  By helping the liver and gall bladder be strong, the skin will become clearer and healthier.

    Your Spring challenge is to stand tall, stretch for the heavens and keep your feet grounded to the earth. Join me for our next class on seasonal foods that promote healthy skin!

    Learn more about spring skin solutions at Susan’s workshop, Food and Skin: Spring Detox and Clarity on Saturday, April 13, 1-2pm.  Susan Reddig, B.S. is a licensed esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings, focusing on beautiful skin from the inside out.  www.billingsclinicalskinsolutions.com.


  • Eat Seasonally: Carrots | 01.31.2013

    CarrotsCarrots are convenient, nutritious vegetables that are very versatile, thanks to their natural sweetness. Enjoyed around the world in dishes both sweet and savory, they add a hearty dose of vitamin A, fiber, antioxidants and vitamin C to your diet. Grate fresh carrots to add a splash of vibrant color to leafy salads and slaws, or make a comforting side of sliced, steamed carrot coins topped with a pat of rich honey butter. Store trimmed, cut carrot sticks upright in a glass half-full of water in the refrigerator for a quick, on-the-go snack with your favorite dip or dressing.

    Carrot and Sweet Potato Tzimmes
    Serves:  6
    Prep time:  15 min. active, 75 minutes total

    Ingredients:
    3 tablespoons butter
    2 cups yellow onion, chopped
    3 cups medium carrots, peeled and cut crosswise into ½- to 1-inch rounds (about 1 pound)
    3 cups sweet potatoes, peeled  and cut into 1-inch cubes (about 1 pound)
    3 cups apple, peeled and cut into
    1-inch pieces
    1 cup prunes, coarsely chopped
    1 cup dried apricots, coarsely chopped
    3 tablespoons water
    3 tablespoons honey
    1 medium orange, zest and juice
    2 medium lemons, zest and juice
    ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
    Salt and pepper, to taste

    Preparation:
    In a large pot or Dutch oven, melt butter over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until soft, about 10 minutes.  Add all the remaining ingredients, stir, and bring to a boil.  Cover and reduce the heat to a low simmer. Cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour, stirring occasionally. The vegetables should be very tender. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

    Serving suggestions:  While this combination of stewed fruits and vegetables is a delicious side dish with baked chicken, it is also a fillings vegetarian entrée served with rice, barley or kasha.

    *Tzimmes is a traditional Jewish dish made from carrots and dried fruits cooked slowly and sweetened with honey.  It is often served during Rosh Hashanah, with the round carrots symbolizing gold coins and prosperity.

    Reprinted by permission from StrongerTogether.coop.  Find articles about your food and where it comes from, recipes, and a whole lot more at www.strongertogether.coop.


  • Food and Skin: Winter Skin Survival | 01.09.2013

    Replenish, Build, Conserve, Hydrate

    It’s the new year – time to burrow in and begin to replenish the skin, body, mind, and spirit. Winter means shoveling snow, bitter winds, bundling up with layers, and dry, scratchy skin. Winter also is a time for the crackling sound of the fireplace, cuddling up in a warm electric throw, or cooking a favorite soup or stew that will warm the insides and relieve the bone-cold chill.

    In the season of winter, the element is Water and the color is black. Water energy is flowing, deeply internal, and the base of life. Water energy encourages hibernation and self-reflection. One can consider this a time of storing energy and replenishing so that when spring comes there will be bursting of new energy and growth!  Winter skin has a tendency to be dry and itchy. We may notice wrinkles, a pale complexion, dark circles under the eyes, hyper pigmentation, red blotchiness, fluid retention, and clogged congested pores.

    Which is the best way to thrive in winter and save our skin?  First, for survival is the need to honor the winter quietness and stillness that is deep within all, to have a place of fulfillment and peace. Next, eat foods that nourish the Water Element. Some suggestions are watermelon, blackberries, blueberries, eggs, cloves, ginger, cinnamon bark, everything in the onion family, chicken, salmon, caviar and seaweeds. Salty and spicy flavors encourage health, but use sea salt rather than regular table salt. Making soups or stews will be warming and will help us tolerate the frosty days. Soups continue to be easy on the digestive tract, helping the body maintain its quietness. 

    Now for the skin. An excellent supplement for skin health is taking a fish oil supplement and eating non-white fish, like salmon. Fish oil lubricates, helps relieve the winter aches and pains, reduces inflammation, and can help to relieve that dry itchiness. Topically, it is very important that ingredients such as hyaluronic acid are in your moisturizer or lotion. Another soothing skin option right from our kitchen cupboard is olive oil. Nothing could be easier!  Use your olive oil to blend with regular moisturizers, apply right after showering, or add some sugar to exfoliate. Do something fun, like indulging your skin in a berries mask and eating dark chocolate.  Your skin will love you.  And you will love your skin.

    This winter avoid the itchies, the flakies, and the reddies by eating healthy warming soups and foods, applying topical soothing oils, and finding time to retreat for self-reflection, meditation and energy conservation. These simple steps will do more for your skin than you can imagine.  In January of the new year, take the challenge to change your approach of skin health care to nourish your whole person. Winter is the time to Replenish, Conserve, Build, and Hydrate.

    Learn more about winter skin solutions at Susan’s workshop, Food and Skin: Winter Skin Survival on Saturday, January 12, 1-2pm.  Susan Reddig, B.S. is a licensed esthetician at Clinical Skin Solutions of Billings, focusing on beautiful skin from the inside out.  www.billingsclinicalskinsolutions.com.

     


  • Drinks to Warm Up Your Holidays | 12.04.2012

    Hand off a hot beverage — to dinner guests, neighbors who drop by or kids during story time — and you instantly warm both tummies and hearts. Make sure you treat yourself too; wrapping your hands around a warm mug in the midst of a cold day can help you unwind!

    Traditional favorites include hot cider, cocoa, teas and coffees — all so good there’s no need to look for replacements. But by adding just a few of the right spices, you can transform these everyday winter drinks into extraordinary festive fare.

    Tips for Spicing Up a Variety of Hot Drinks

    * Mull to be merry. Mulling a beverage simply means heating and spicing it. Sometimes sweeteners and/or other beverages are added, too. Mulled apple juice or cider is classic, but why not mull other favorites, like cherry, raspberry, white grape and cranberry juices, as well as red and white wines? Just be careful not to boil the wine or you’ll ruin the taste and evaporate the alcohol. Good mulling spices include allspice, cinnamon, cloves, fenugreek, ginger, lemon peel, nutmeg, orange peel and star anise. Have fun experimenting — or streamline your routine by stocking up on a mulling spice mix.

    * Give the crock a workout. Fill your crock pot with an aromatic and warm spiced beverage and keep it on low throughout the day. You’ll have a ready-to-serve treat at any time, and your home will be scented, too.

    * Make an impression with homemade gifts. For simple but lovely homemade gifting, combine the dry ingredients for a special hot drink in a small jar or canister and tie with a festive ribbon. Punch a hole in a recipe card with mixing directions and attach to the ribbon. For even easier gifting, simply place a package of beverage mix — like those mulling spices — in a festive mug and tie with a ribbon. Or choose a special tea and deliver it in a pretty cup and saucer.

    * Stock up on cinnamon sticks. Indispensable for mulling, cinnamon sticks also spruce up hot party drinks when used as swizzlers.

    * Spruce up your black teas. Add cinnamon sticks, orange peel and/or lemon peel to any black tea. Sweeten, if you like, with honey or brown sugar. To richen the flavor even further, add a tablespoon or two of cognac.

    * Enliven green teas with crystallized ginger and sliced fruit (like pears).

    * Think ethnic. For Spanish flair, add black pepper and chilies or cinnamon to hot chocolate. For French influence, thicken cocoas with cornstarch or arrowroot and stir in some Grand Marnier and vanilla extract. Top with a pinch of freshly ground nutmeg.

    * For a mocha drink, simply use strongly brewed coffee in place of some of the liquid in your favorite hot cocoa recipe.

    * Add quality flavorings or extracts for an instant flavor boost. Frontier Natural Products offers every option from almond to walnut for any hot beverage — including milk, cocoa, tea and coffee.

     

    Here’s the recipe for deliciously rich toddy that adds delight to any gathering:

    Visions of Sugarplums Toddy

    Ingredients:
    4 cups milk, divided in half (dairy, rice, or soy)
    2 Tbsp. honey
    1/8 tsp. cardamom powder
    4 oz. white baking chocolate, chopped
    1 tsp. vanilla extract
    1/4 tsp. nutmeg powder
    4 6-inch cinnamon sticks

    Directions:
    Warm 2 cups of the milk, honey, cardamom, and baking chocolate in a saucepan until chocolate is melted. Add remaining milk and heat until warm. Stir in vanilla. Pour into cups, sprinkle with nutmeg and add cinnamon stick stirrers. Substitute almond extract (or another flavoring, like peppermint extract) for the vanilla now and then. At a toddler’s tuck-in time, serve without the chocolate to induce slumber. Makes about 4 servings.

    Reprinted with permission from Frontier Natural Foods Co-op.


  • Eat Seasonally: Pear Galette | 10.31.2012

    Pears, like apples and raspberries, are members of the same plant family as the fragrant rose.  With over 3,000 varieties, pears appear in many shades of red, purple, yellow, green, and brown.  Peak pear season ranges from late summer to early winter, when common varieties like Bosc, Bartlett, and Red Bartlett are readily available.  Look for juicy, exquisite French varieties like D’Anjou seasonally. When ripe, pears change from a green to yellow hue visible through their primary color.  Pears are a good source of fiber and vitamin C.  Add chopped pears to a quinoa and spinach salad or try an open-faced sandwich with arugula, Camembert and grilled pears on a baguette.

     

    Pear GalettePear Galette
    Posted with permission from www.strongertogether.coop

    Serving Size:  6 servings
    Total Time:  1 hour, 25 minutes; 30 minutes active

    Ingredients:

    Dough:

    • 1 cup all-purpose flour
    • 1 tablespoon sugar
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 2 large eggs (1 for dough, 1 for egg wash)
    • 1 teaspoon milk
    • 5 tablespoons  butter, cold and cut into small pieces

    Filling:

    • 2 tablespoons apricot jam
    • 2 largeAnjoupears
    • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
    • 2 teaspoons sugar
    • Pinch of ground nutmeg

    Preparation

    1. To make the dough, whisk together flour, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter or fingers until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. In a small bowl, whisk together one egg and milk. Add half of the egg and milk mixture to the dough and mix to incorporate. Mix in the remaining egg and milk, and make the dough into a flat disk. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. After refrigeration, roll out the dough into a 9 to 10-inch circle and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Brush the top surface of the dough with the apricot jam, and return it to the refrigerator until the pears are ready.
    2. Preheat oven to 425°F. While the oven is heating, quarter and core the pears, then slice them lengthwise into quarter-inch slices. Place the pear slices in a fan shape on the chilled circle of dough, leaving a 1 1/2-inch border. Drizzle melted butter over the pears and then sprinkle with sugar and nutmeg. Gently fold the edge of the dough up and over the pears to form a rim. In a small bowl, beat the remaining egg and brush the rim and edges of the dough with the beaten egg. Place the galette in the oven and bake for about 25 minutes until the edges are browning. Let rest a few minutes before slicing.

     

    Serving Suggestion
    The beauty of this fruit tart is in its irregularly-shaped handmade crust. Serve warm with French vanilla ice cream or brandy sauce and whipped cream.