Archives for July 2016

  • This Week’s Local Produce | 07.25.2016

    Organic Montana-grown cherries are IN!!

    Flathead cherries are in! Enjoy every morsel of these Montana-grown delicacies. Get ’em while you can!

    Enjoy summer’s bounty and find seasonal, farm-fresh produce for your meals everyday at the Co-op.

    Local produce is available while it lasts. Check out the store for new arrivals all summer long!

     

    New This Week

    Beans – green, yellow, & purple

    Parsnips

     

    What’s local now?

    Basil

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    Beets

    Broccoli

    Cabbage

    Carrots

    Cauliflower

    Chives

    Cucumbers

    Garlic Scapes

    Kale

    Kohlrabi

    LettuceIMG_0352

    Mint

    Mustard Greens

    Parsley

    Onions

    Onions, Green

    Potatoes

    Radishes

    Sage

    Spinach

    Sprouts

    Tomatoes, Slicing

    Tomatoes, Cherry

    Tomatoes, Sun-Dried

    Zucchini

     

     

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  • Take the Local Food Challenge this July | 07.12.2016

    Good Earth Market is teaming up with 25 locally owned businesses across the state to sponsor the first annual Montana Local Food Challenge.

    Throughout the month of July, individuals, businesses, and families will challenge their eating and shopping habits by committing to eating more Montana-grown foods. Whether you want to commit to eating or shopping at more restaurants and grocers that serve local food, growing your own garden, spending more dollars per month on local food, joining a CSA, or asking your school and hospital boards to procure more local foods, there is something for everyone, from the Costco-only family, to the college student on a tight budget, to the die-hard locavore.

    Eating local brings a myriad of benefits: besides being fresher, more nutritious, and better tasting, local food builds communities and local economies, supports family farms and ranches, and protects genetic diversity and regional food security.

    Here at Good Earth Market, we strive to provide customers with fresh, affordable local food and build lasting relationships with our agricultural communities that are the backbone of our state.

    Since our founding over 20 years ago, Good Earth Market Co-op has believed that building a strong, local food system is a two-fold process involving both the consumer and the local producer. We have worked hard to fulfill our mission to improve access to local foods in our community, not only to give the consumer options, but to provide a market for local producers. We’ve been a leader in local foods from the start and even now continue to provide hundreds of local products every single day. As the first store to carry many of our community’s favorite local foods, such as Trevino’s Tortillas, BBar Ranch, Kate’s Garden & CSA, and Healthy Pantry, we are proud not just talk about local foods, but live it everyday!

    Participants in the challenge will find local foods everyday at Good Earth Market – dairy, meats, grains, and produce! Just look for the Get Local shelf tag throughout the store.

    Get Local circle shelf tags-page-001All are invited to participate! Go to MTlocalfoodchallenge.org to take the challenge and start working towards a better Montana today. The website will give you access to lots of helpful resources, like where to eat and grocery shop locally, where to source your local ingredients, and why it all matters.


  • Why the Comparison between Sitting & Smoking? |

    Already feel like you are doing everything for your health, but unaware of the impact of one our most seemingly innocuous habits of the day?  Turns out our sedentary lifestyles are impacting our health more significantly than previously recognized and these negative health consequences are not reversed with a few hours at the gym!!

    Researcher Dr. James Levine, from the Mayo Clinic, is credited with coining the phrase “sitting is the new smoking.” He is a leading endocrinologist, who has studied the effects of sitting on our metabolism and overall health. Prolonged sitting, like long-term smoking, increases our risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, depression and all-cause mortality (a term for any cause of death). Yes, you read that right, according to several large population studies, all of us weekend warriors and gym rats are still at increased risk as long as we continue to sit for several hours per day at our desk, on the couch or driving.

    So, you say, thank you doomsayer Dr. Phillips-Dorsett, what am I supposed to do about that??

    Thankfully, short of returning to life as we knew it 100 years ago, when we were 5 times more active in our daily routine than now, there are several strategies to combat our sedentary habits. I have listed a few below.

    Move throughout the day. A recent study published in Diabetes Care presented evidence that periodic light walking or ‘simple resistance activities,’ like half squats and knee raises, improves after meal levels of blood sugar, insulin and triglycerides (a type of fat measured in the blood). Reducing these markers means improved heart and blood vessel health. Do anything that increases the amount of steps throughout your day: use the bathroom on another floor and take the stairs, or park your car at the far end of the parking lot (also reduces risk of getting hit by or hitting the other cars jockeying for the closest spot), then walk to the store.

    Modify your work environment. Standing desks are often prescribed for and sometimes covered by insurance for back pain and other musculoskeletal ailments. See your primary care doctor for more information. There are now even treadmill desks, which have been shown to increase memory and information retention. Ask your clients or staff if some meetings can be held during a walking session. Get a headset for your phone and walk around your office while speaking with clients.

    Walk to work, school, the grocery store, etc. If you are within a mile of work or your favorite shopping center, strongly consider walking or biking there. It’s easy to get in the habit of driving everywhere, but perhaps the next time you reach for your keys, think about getting out your sneakers and a backpack instead.

    Developing new habits is always a challenge. Start with something you see yourself doing regularly, instead of something that you commit to for a week or two and then don’t find you are able to continue. Creating a new routine will undoubtedly take some trial and error and the type of activity will likely need to be modified with the seasons. The key is to stay consistent. So if you have avoided smoking for your health or are a former smoker, this new information is timely. Don’t hesitate to take the next step (many steps) to ensure you are doing all you can to remain healthy.

    Dr. Danielle PHillips-Dorsett

    Dr. Phillips-Dorsett received her Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine in 2015 from Bastyr University in Seattle, Washington.  She places emphasis on understanding the underlying cause of disturbance in a person that leads to physical and emotional discomfort. Using this as a foundation, she helps patients by bolstering their own defense systems to not only return the body to health, but to optimize well being.

    Dr. Phillips-Dorsett joined Yellowstone Naturopathic Clinic in November 2015 as one of the Family Medicine/Naturopathic Oncology residents. She sees patients at both St. Vincent Frontier Cancer Center and Yellowstone Naturopathic Clinic.

     

    For more on wellness, please attend a free Lunchtime Food for Thought with Dr. Audrey Schenewerk at the Yellowstone Naturopathic Clinic on Tuesday, July 19th; and, with Dr. Jennifer Krieger (“How to Handle Stress by Living in the Moment“) at Good Earth Market on Wednesday, July 20, 12:05-12:50pm.